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SOTW 4--anybody want to share?


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#1 Aubrey

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 07:26 PM

Lesson Plans, what chapters you squished/skipped, etc? I'm overwhelmed. I've squished & squished--even started it back in the spring for the coming school yr & planned a few ch's for the following summer--& I've still got 42 wks.

I know. There are only 42 ch's, so that doesn't make sense. But HOW could I only spend a ch or 2 on something as big as WWII???? And the Great Depression was, well, GREAT. We've spent the summer on the pioneers, but now we're studying Native Americans, & I don't see how we can possibly finish that in less than 12 wks. We're not done w/ the pioneers. I planned 6 wks for the Civil War, but it took us more like 12, & finally we just...stopped. We weren't really done. We'd hardly done any crafts & only a little cooking.

I also know that I could spend longer than a yr on SOTW 4, that I could just let learning be organic & flowing & follow our interests. But...I'm not so good at that, either.

*sigh* Maybe I can "fix" our calendar to contain extra weeks. Hehehe. *That* I can consider. :lol:

#2 Pata

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 07:31 PM

I just finished putting together a very rough plan for SOTW4. I know that we won't use it for another year, but we'll be back in the States in October and I'll be doing my book shopping then, between now and then I don't have much time (basically I'm just trying to justify my need to plan :)). If you want to see it I'd be happy to email it to you, it's in excel so I don't think I can easily attach it here.

#3 patchfire

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 07:33 PM

I also have a big fact SOTW 4 plan I can send you. :)

#4 Skadi

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 07:37 PM

Personally, I think a nine year old isn't old enough to understand the complexities that led to WWI and WWII. We plan to stop our study of modern times in the early 20th century and then spend some time to study it in depth the second and third time around (8th and 12th grades).

#5 Aubrey

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 07:40 PM

Personally, I think a nine year old isn't old enough to understand the complexities that led to WWI and WWII. We plan to stop our study of modern times in the early 20th century and then spend some time to study it in depth the second and third time around (8th and 12th grades).


My kids love complexities & gray issues, but more than anything, ds is looking forward to playing Axis & Allies, I'm looking fwd to studying hist after the Civil War (never even got as far as the Civil War--had to do Tx hist over & over, lol), & dh is a World Hist major--we're just coming upon the stuff that will make him most jealous that I'm hs'ing & he isn't. :lol: Definitely don't want to skip it. :001_smile:

#6 HollyDay

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 07:44 PM

I'm planning on taking 2 years with SOTW 4. I'm using the list I saw on Paula's Archives to incorporate Hakim's history books plus tons of readers. Usborne has a bunch of WW 1 and 2 books for this age range. This is such a rich time period, I do not want to rush it.

#7 Aubrey

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 07:48 PM

I also have a big fact SOTW 4 plan I can send you. :)


Pata & Kash--yes, thank you! Because of the complexities of these periods, the order of ch's in SOTW 4 doesn't make as much sense to me as the previous ones have, so I've grouped ch's into unit studies, to allow greater depth on some subjects. For ex, sometimes it seems like we just do a 1/2 ch here & a 1/2 ch there on China, so I've put those together, hoping it will form a more cohesive pic. Here's what I've got so far:

America (summer 2010)
8a 83-86 Rails, Zones, and Bulbs, 1869--I put general dates here, so I can make sure I'm still somewhat chronological on the events I don't really know)
15b 161-167 The Spanish-American War, 1898
16a 169-177 Moving West, 1846-1912

1st 6wks
PRE WWI
(3wks)
Germany, et al
7b 75-81 The Second Reich, 1870
18b 196-201 The Balkan Mess, 1878
South America 1wk
6a 59-62 Paraguay and the Triple Alliance, 1865
10a 103-107 The War of the Pacific, 1879
13a 135-139 Brazil's Republic, 1888
Ottoman Empire 1wk
2b 18-23 The Crimean War, 1853
9b 96-101 The Sick Man of Europe, 1876
13b 139-144 Abdulhamid the Red, 1894
18a 191-196 Persia, Its Enemies, and Its 'Friends', 1906 (Mid E)
PRE WWI ASIA (3wks)--not that WWI effected Asia (I don't know) just that the dates fall generally pre-war
2aIV 15-18 Japan Re-opens, 1853
4bIV 41-46 The Taiping Rebellion, 1850-60
8bIV 86-90 Japan's Meiji Restoration, 1872
9a 93-96 The Dutch East Indies, 1873
15a 157-161 The Korean Battleground, 1894
17a 179-183 The Boxer Rebellion, 1898
17b 185-189 The Czar and the Admiral, 1904
19a 203-205 The Last Emperor, 1908
19b 207-209 The Vietnamese Restoration Society, 1903-08

2nd 6 wks
WWI (6+wks)
Ireland
12a 123-127 Ireland's Troubles, 1845
22a 233-237 The Easter Uprising, 1916
Russia
14a 147-150 The Next-to-Last Czar of Russia, 1889
21a 223-227 The Russian Revolution, 1914
23b 251-254 The Rise of Joseph Stalin, 1922
Germany, et al.
20b 216-221 World War I, 1914
21b 227-231 The End of World War I (women‘s suffrage), 1918
23a 245-249 The Peace of Versailles, 1919

3rd 6wks
INDIA (1wk)
22b 237-242 Indian Nationalism (Ghandi), 1919
30a 329-332 Muslims and Hindus in India, 1919-47
39a 433-437 India After Partition, 1961
PRE WWII (5wks)
America
26a 281-286 Black Tuesday and a New Deal, 1929 (3 wks)
Germany
26b 286-290 Hitler's Rise to Power, 1930
27b 299-302 Rebuilding the 'Fatherland', 1938
24b 260-266 Fascism in Italy, 1923
28a 305-309 The Three-War War, 1937-41

4th & 5th 6wks
WWII
(12 wks)--could be as little as 8, though
S Am
34a 373-377 Argentina's President and His Wife (Juan Peron), 1945 (1wk, because I LOVE Evita & the activities for this crack me up)
America
31b 345-349 The Marshall Plan, 1940-60--WWII
Germany
28b 309-314 The Holocaust, 1935-45 (3wks)
29a 317-322 The War that Stretched Across the World, 1940-45
29b 323-327 The Atom Bomb, 1945--WWII (at least a couple of wks, so we can do an Einstein bio, too)
30a 332-336 The Partitioning of Palestine, 1948--WWII

6th 6wks
EGYPT
(1wk)
10b 107-111 The Suez Canal, 1867
24a 257-260 The First King of Egypt, 1922
31a 339-343 The Suez Crisis, 1956
AFRICA
(3wks)--maybe shorter?
3b 29-34 Wandering Through Africa (Livingstone), 1857
11b 117-121 Carving Up Africa, 1870s
12b 127-133 The Boers and the British, 1880s
14b 150-155 Ethiopia and Italy, 1896
32a 351-355 One Country, Two Different Worlds, 1948
34b 379-383 Freedom in the Belgian Congo, 1950s
42b 469-474 Africa, Independent, 1994
CHINA, JAPAN, COMMUNISM (3wks)--gosh, for the Vietnam & Korean Wars...I don't know if 3wks is enough.
25a 269-272 Japan, China, and a Pretend Emperor, 1928
25b 273-278 The Long March, 1934 (Communism Birth)
32b 355-360 Two Republics of China, 1949
33a 363-367 Ho Chi Minh and the Viet Minh, 1945-54
33b 367-370 The Korean War, 1945-53
37a 411-415 The Vietnam War, 1959
41a 455-458 Democracy in China?, 1966-76, 89

7th 6wks
COMMUNISM, 1980s
(6+wks)
America
35a 385-389 The Space Race, 1957
35b 389-395 Thirteen Days in October, 1962
36a 397- 402 The Death of John F. Kennedy, 1963
36b 402-408 Civil Rights, 1960s
40b 449-452 The End of the Cold War, 1980s
Russia
38a 423-426 Soviet Invasion, 1979
40a 445-449 Chernobyl and Nuclear Power, 1986
41b 459-462 Communism Crumbles, 1989
Germany, Austria, Poland, Balkans
41b 459-461 Communism Crumbles 1989-91

MIDDLE EAST, CURRENT EVENTS (summer 2011)
37b 415-420 Trouble in the Middle East, 1967
38b 426-431 Terrorism, 1972
39b 439-443 Iran and Iraq, 1978
42a 465-468 The First Persian Gulf War, 1991

#8 Aubrey

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 07:51 PM

I'm planning on taking 2 years with SOTW 4. I'm using the list I saw on Paula's Archives to incorporate Hakim's history books plus tons of readers. Usborne has a bunch of WW 1 and 2 books for this age range. This is such a rich time period, I do not want to rush it.


I'm tempted, but I think we get 12yrs either way, so I guess I'd rather just take 1 yr now, to make sure we have 2 more tries at it when they're older.

But really, since we started early & we're using 2 summers, it kinda works out to 2yrs. :001_smile: Now I'm just debating Christmas, Thanksgiving, & Saturdays. ;):lol:

#9 crimsonkelley

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 10:38 PM

When we were doing SOTW 4, my daughter was in 4th grade. We started late (see below) so we didn't finish at the end of the year. We were in the middle of a move, so I didn't continue to schoool. However, she continued to read the book on her own - after she realized I wasn't going to. At first I thought we "had" to finish, but I realized that we still have 2 more times to go through that time period and that she got what she needed at the time.

With SOTW 3, we had to stop before we finished the book. We just picked up in the fall and finished where we left off. It was nice b/c no one else was on our cycle - so there was never a wait list for library books. We also could flow smoothly into SOTW 4 b/c we had just finished SOTW 3.

Just b/c you've stopped schooling - you can always fill your library basket with the book selections from the SOTW 4 AG and see what happens. :001_smile:

#10 southmetromom

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 11:13 PM

We took two years. No regrets. My son is a history buff and truly enjoyed it. We interspersed some in-depth American history in the process.

Sandy

#11 Mallory

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 08:19 AM

We enjoy it more and my kids really do learn better if we cover things deeply, not worrying about covering some of everything.

Am I understanding right that you still have 12 weeks to go before you even get to the 1st 6weeks part of your schedule?

Looking at your schedule I think you are less interested in non- western-civ. I would cut

South America 1wk
6a 59-62 Paraguay and the Triple Alliance, 1865
10a 103-107 The War of the Pacific, 1879
13a 135-139 Brazil's Republic, 1888

INDIA (1wk)
22b 237-242 Indian Nationalism (Ghandi), 1919
30a 329-332 Muslims and Hindus in India, 1919-47
39a 433-437 India After Partition, 1961

EGYPT (1wk)
10b 107-111 The Suez Canal, 1867
24a 257-260 The First King of Egypt, 1922
31a 339-343 The Suez Crisis, 1956
AFRICA
(3wks)--maybe shorter?
3b 29-34 Wandering Through Africa (Livingstone), 1857
11b 117-121 Carving Up Africa, 1870s
12b 127-133 The Boers and the British, 1880s
14b 150-155 Ethiopia and Italy, 1896
32a 351-355 One Country, Two Different Worlds, 1948
34b 379-383 Freedom in the Belgian Congo, 1950s
42b 469-474 Africa, Independent, 1994

Also, maybe cut some of this

Ottoman Empire 1wk
2b 18-23 The Crimean War, 1853
9b 96-101 The Sick Man of Europe, 1876
13b 139-144 Abdulhamid the Red, 1894
18a 191-196 Persia, Its Enemies, and Its 'Friends', 1906 (Mid E)
PRE WWI ASIA (3wks)--not that WWI effected Asia (I don't know) just that the dates fall generally pre-war
2aIV 15-18 Japan Re-opens, 1853
4bIV 41-46 The Taiping Rebellion, 1850-60
8bIV 86-90 Japan's Meiji Restoration, 1872
9a 93-96 The Dutch East Indies, 1873
15a 157-161 The Korean Battleground, 1894
17a 179-183 The Boxer Rebellion, 1898
17b 185-189 The Czar and the Admiral, 1904
19a 203-205 The Last Emperor, 1908
19b 207-209 The Vietnamese Restoration Society, 1903-08


Just cut them. You know you aren't going to have any problems filling in those weeks, and sure you could try to add in the readings or briefly touch on the subjects, but IMHO you'll enjoy the rest more if you just dump some things.

I also think if you really enjoy history then trying to recenter your school on history. Throw out the lesson plans for writing and grammar and do the assignments with history subjects. Do foriegn languages while looking at history books. Skip science or art or music (or all three) if history is really calling to you this year.

Just some thoughts, hope something is helpful!

#12 Aubrey

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 10:39 AM

Just cut them. You know you aren't going to have any problems filling in those weeks, and sure you could try to add in the readings or briefly touch on the subjects, but IMHO you'll enjoy the rest more if you just dump some things.


You live *dangerously.* :lol: Maybe that's what I should do, but it gives me goosebumps. Not the good kind. (I'm a box-checker.)

I also think if you really enjoy history then trying to recenter your school on history. Throw out the lesson plans for writing and grammar and do the assignments with history subjects. Do foriegn languages while looking at history books. Skip science or art or music (or all three) if history is really calling to you this year.


I enjoy hs'ing! :lol: I love, love, love the history. We do it during the day & then some more in the eve around the dinner table w/ Dad.

But I love science, too. Just hs'ing. It's like the science I've waited my whole life for. Mom says it was my fav subj until I had an awful teacher in 2nd g. Doing NOEO, I start to remember that.

And I'm a lit major. I've taught writing for YEARS, & I write freelance now. My kids are finally getting big enough to sort-of do it, & punky 7yo has decided that since I'm teaching her, she's going to be a better writer than me. :glare: :lol: And we just started MCT a couple of mos ago & BW recently. I LOVE THEM! :001_huh:

Forget vacations. I'm buying books. :D

#13 Mallory

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 03:56 PM

Last year I had a 9th, 4th, 3rd graders, and 3 yo and 1 yo. I've been doing this for a while ;). But last year was really the first year I cut parts of curriculums.

My 9th grader was doing Sonlight Alt. 7 and after playing catch up on weekends and vacations for the first couple semesters I realized we didn't have to check all the boxes :D WE could skip whole books even if they looked good and we'd like to do them for the only reason of keeping our sanity and staying on track.

And it really was freeing and made school much more doable! Hey, my 9 year old can do this already we can skip to the next chapter :001_huh:!!!

I mean lets look at your 6th 6 weeks.

6th 6wks
EGYPT
(1wk)
10b 107-111 The Suez Canal, 1867
24a 257-260 The First King of Egypt, 1922
31a 339-343 The Suez Crisis, 1956
AFRICA
(3wks)--maybe shorter?
3b 29-34 Wandering Through Africa (Livingstone), 1857
11b 117-121 Carving Up Africa, 1870s
12b 127-133 The Boers and the British, 1880s
14b 150-155 Ethiopia and Italy, 1896
32a 351-355 One Country, Two Different Worlds, 1948
34b 379-383 Freedom in the Belgian Congo, 1950s
42b 469-474 Africa, Independent, 1994
CHINA, JAPAN, COMMUNISM (3wks)--gosh, for the Vietnam & Korean Wars...I don't know if 3wks is enough.
25a 269-272 Japan, China, and a Pretend Emperor, 1928
25b 273-278 The Long March, 1934 (Communism Birth)
32b 355-360 Two Republics of China, 1949
33a 363-367 Ho Chi Minh and the Viet Minh, 1945-54
33b 367-370 The Korean War, 1945-53
37a 411-415 The Vietnam War, 1959
41a 455-458 Democracy in China?, 1966-76, 89


What if you had 6 weeks just for the last part--CHINA, JAPAN, COMMUNISM (3wks). Then instead of touching on the suez canal or livingstone (sure those are good but you can never cover all of history, never), and you could spend more time on comunisim and the vietnam and korean wars.

I know we would rather go deep than try to fit in lots of topics. That also gives us more time to do projects and activites, and I was getting tired of only getting to the reading and writing parts.


I havn't actually seen BW or MCT, but what I was trying to say was to use those lesson plans only with history topics. Since you also feel comfortable with these subjects it shouldn't be that hard. You read the lesson but teach it with your history books/topics.

So if today's lesson is about nouns, then instead of using the example sentances from the textbook or workbook, use sentances from your history book. If today's lesson is about similies then find them in your historical fiction. Use history for copywork and narrations.

Good luck, either way I'm sure it will be fun!

#14 Aubrey

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 07:37 PM

What if you had 6 weeks just for the last part--CHINA, JAPAN, COMMUNISM (3wks). Then instead of touching on the suez canal or livingstone (sure those are good but you can never cover all of history, never), and you could spend more time on comunisim and the vietnam and korean wars.


Oh, that would be fun! And, actually, we've already done Livingston--sometime in the spring.

I don't want to lean too heavily twd w'ern hist, I just know it better, so I *know* there's lots of stuff I want to do w/ it, kwim? But if I skip the e'ern hist, I'll never know it better.

Huh. So just...skip stuff, huh? Just like that? Hmmmm....

#15 mcconnellboys

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 09:35 PM

Here's what I did, but I don't know that it's going to help you any:

Fourth Grade History and Literature - Modern World

This is based around the SOTW IV spreads. If you need more details on the history books I used as spines, I can provide authors, etc. for those. With this time period, a lot of our reading didn’t really mirror the history subject under study (as it did with earlier time periods). Instead, we were reading from authors whose writings were basically contemporaneous with the time period we were studying in history.

Week 1
SOTW Ch. 1, Britain’s Empire: Victoria/ Sepoy Mutiny

History:
Read about Victorian England from Barnes and Noble World; Complete Book of World History; How Children Lived; A Child’s Eye View of History.

Read about India under the East India Company from Haywood’s Historical Atlas (19th Century).

Lit.:
Read from Tom Brown’s School Days, Hughes
At Her Majesty’s Request (very good)
Wolves of Willoughby Chase (good)
Watched video of A Little Princess, WB Family Entertainment (very good)
Watched “Kim”, adapted from Rudyard Kipling’s book (Public Media Video w/ Peter O’Toole)

Student reading:
Florence Nightingale, Lucy Lethbridge (Usborne Famous Lives)
Bullseye Step Into Classics: A Little Princess (Frances Hodgson Burnett)
A Drummer Boy’s Battle: Florence Nightingale, Dave and Neta Jackson


SOTW Ch. 2, West Against East: Japan Re-Opens/ Crimean War

History:
Read from Haywood’s Atlas regarding both Japan and Russia.
Read from Complete World and Usborne’s Last 500 Years re: Japan.
Read excerpts from The Crimean War, Deborah Bachrach.
Read from Commodore Perry in the Land of the Shogun, Rhoda Blumberg.

Lit:
Read from Russian Fairy Tales, Marie Ponsot (good)

Student reading:
Salt: A Russian Folktale, Jane Langton
The Month-Brothers: A Slavic Tale, Samuel Marshak
The Magic Goldfish: A Russian Folktale, Aleksandr Pushkin


Week 2
SOTW Ch. 3, British Invasions: Great Game/ Wandering through Africa

History:
Haywood Atlas re: Africa

Read more on African Explorers and the scramble for Africa from: Complete World; Last 500 Years; Barnes and Noble World; Exploration and Discovery, Simon Adams.

Read more about areas in Africa Livingstone explored using Mozambique, R. S. James.

Read from Zimbabwe, Enchantment of the World, Barbara and Stillman Rogers.

Read from Botswana, Enchantment of the World, Jason Laure’.

Read from Faces re: life in the Kalahari, among the San.

Student reading:
Read from Exploring Africa, Hazel Martell and Gerald Wood (re: Stanley, Livingstone, Caillie, Barth, Richardson, Burton, Speke, Grant, etc.)
Buried in Ice: The Mystery of a Lost Arctic Expedition, Owen Beattie, et al


SOTW Ch. 4, Resurrection and Rebellion: Italy/ Taiping Rebellion

History:
Read about Italian unification from Barnes and Noble World.

Read about the Taiping Rebellion in Complete World History and Last 500 Years.

Lit.:
Rebels of the Heavenly Kingdom, Paterson (I would hold off on this until the teen years in doing it again - or pre-read, at least)

The Life and Times of Giuseppi Verdi, Jim Whiting


Week 3
Civil War, SOTW Ch. 5

History:
Read from Barnes and Noble World; Complete World; Last 500 Years.
Read the Civil War section from The U.S. at War, June English and Thomas Jones (Scholastic).
Read Shattered Dreams: The Story of Mary Todd Lincoln, David R. Collins.
Watched “Gods and Generals”, two part movie.
Read The Boys’ War, Jim Murphy (very good).
Looked through Civil War Days, John Bowen.
Listened to part of eyewitness account by Frank Haskell of The Battle of Gettysburg.
Used Haywood’s Historical Atlas.
Read from Petersburg, Bruce Brager (Seiges that Changed the World series)
Read from Brown Paper School U.S. Kids’ History: Book of the American Civil War, Howard Egger-Bovet, et al.
Read from The Civil War: Ulysses S. Grant, David King
Read from The Civil War: Abraham Lincoln, Deborah Kops

Lit.:
Rifles for Watie, Harold Keith (Wonderful!)
The Yearling, film version

Student Reading:
Just a Few Words, Mr. Lincoln, Fritz
The Red Badge of Courage (Great Illus. Classics)
Little Women, Bullseye Step into Classics (adapted by Monica Kulling)
Abraham Lincoln, D’Aulaires
The Value of Respect: The Story of Abraham Lincoln, Ann Donegan Johnson
Yankee Blue or Rebel Gray? The Civil War Adventures of Sam Shaw, Kate Connell
Mr. Lincoln’s Whiskers, Burke Davis


Week 4
continuing Civil War readings from last week…….

Lit:
The Civil War, Marc Frey (pop-up, interactive book)

Student reading:
Bull Run, Paul Fleischman (Wonderful!)
He also read parts of Frey’s Civil War (above) on his own
The Journal of James Edmond Pease: A Civil War Union Soldier, Virginia, 1863, Jim Murphy (My Name is America series) (My son really liked this book!)


Week 5
SOTW Ch. 6, Two Tries for Freedom: Paraguay/ Canada

History:
Read from Last 500 Years; Barnes and Noble World; Complete World re: struggles of all South America during the 1800’s.
Read from Cultures of the World: Paraguay, Leslie Jermyn.
Read from Paraguay in Pictures, Lerner Publications.
Read from The History of Nations: Canada, Nick Treanor, editor.
Read from Canada, Star of the North, Shelley Sateren.
Read Canada: Globetrotters’ Club, Janice Hamilton.

Lit.:
The Call of the Wild, London (wonderful, of course…..)

Student reading:
The Last Safe House, Barbara Greenwood (re: underground railroad into Canada)


SOTW Ch. 7, Two Empires, Three Republics/Kingdom: 2&3/ Second Reich

History:
Read from encyclopedia regarding Napoleon III and Bismarck as our library had no books on either of them……


Week 6
SOTW Ch. 8, Becoming Modern: Rails, Zones and Bulbs/ Japan’s Meiji Restoration

History:
Read Across America on an Emigrant Train, Jim Murphy (re: Robert Louis Stevenson - good, but mature theme so you may want to pre-read).

Railroad Fever, Monica Halpern
Women of the Old West, Judith Alter

Read from Full Steam Ahead: The Race to Build a Continental Railroad, Rhoda Blumberg.

Recapped historical period with readings from Complete World and Last 500 Years.

Lit.:
The Sea Maidens of Japan, Lili Bell (simple)

Student reading:
A Picture Book of Thomas Alva Edison, David Adler
The Journey of Sean Sullivan, William Durbin (Dear America series) (he liked this one, too…..)


Week 7
SOTW Ch. 9, Two more Empires, 2 Rebellions: Dutch East Indies/ Sick Man of Europe

History:
Haywood’s Atlas re: Ottoman Empire.
Listened to part of Krakatoa, Simon Winchester, on tape.
Read from Bulgaria in Pictures about the land and its people up through independence in the late 1800’s from the Ottomans (Margaret J. Goldstein).

Lit.:
Read two more Jack London short stories: Brown Wolf and That Spot
White Fang, London

Student reading:
The 21 Balloons, William Pene Du Bois (very good)
Secret of the Andes, Ann Nolan Clark
Selections from a Child’s Garden of Verses, Robert Louis Stevenson (Dandelion Library)

SOTW Ch. 10, Canal to East and Very Dry Desert: War of Pacific/ Suez Canal

History:
Read about the Pacific War from Bolivia in Pictures, Lerner Publications.


Week 8
SOTW Ch. 11, Far Parts of the World: Iron Outlaw/ Carving up Africa

History:
Read more about Australia from Complete World..
Read This Our Dark Country, The American Settlers of Liberia, Catherine Reef.

Watched Wonders of the African World: Black Kingdoms of the Nile and The Swahili Coast, with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.; PBS film.

Read from Building the Suez Canal, S. C. Burchell (Horizon Magazine).

Lit.:
The Shadows of the Ghadames, Joelle Stolz (good)

Student Reading:
Captains Courageous, Rudyard Kipling (Great Illus. Classics)


SOTW Ch. 12, Unhappy Unions: Ireland’s Troubles/ Boers and British

History:
Read more on Ireland from Complete World.

Read Feed the Children First, Irish Memories of the Great Hunger, editor Mary E. Lyons.

Read from Black Potatoes, Susan Bartoletti.

Lit.:
Nory Ryan’s Song, Patricia Reilly Giff (book on tape - wonderful!)
Maggie’s Door, Giff (book on tape - also good - sequel)


Week 9
SOTW Ch. 13, Old Fashioned Emperor and Red Sultan: Brazil’s Rep/Abdul Hamid the Red

History:
Read from Faces: Armenia, Cobblestone.
Read from Armenia: Enchantment of the World, Martin Hintz and from Cultures of the World, Armenia, Sakina Dhilawala.

Listened to selection of Armenian music from “Armenia, Armenia”, a Monitor Music of the World CD.

Read from Countries of the World, Brazil, Leslie Jermyn.

Student reading:
So Say the Little Monkeys, Nancy Van Laan (Brazilian folklore)

SOTW Ch. 14, Two Czars and 2 Emperors: Next to last Czar of Russia/ Ethiopia and Italy

Student reading:
The Lion’s Whiskers and Other Ethiopian Tales, Brent Ashabranner, et al


Week 10
SOTW Ch. 15, Small Countries w/ Large Invaders: Korea/ Spanish-American War

History:
Read more about the Spanish-American War from The U.S. at War (Scholastic).

Read more about the war, Presidents, acquisition of countries and related matters (General Dewey, et al) from The Young Reader’s Companion to American History, John Garraty.

Read more on Roosevelt from Teddy Roosevelt, Rough Rider, Louis Sabin and from Carry a Big Stick: The Uncommon Heroism of Theodore Roosevelt (life portion only), George Grant.

Read Under the Royal Palms, A Childhood in Cuba, Alma Flor Ada.

Lit.:
Typhoon, Joseph Conrad (Reader’s Digest Best Loved Books for Young Readers)

Student reading:
Black Beauty, Anna Sewell (DK Eyewitness Classics)
Korean Children’s Favorite Stories, Kim So-un

to be continued....

#16 mcconnellboys

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 09:36 PM

Week 11
SOTW Ch. 16, Expansion of the U.S.

History:
Read from Haywood’s Atlas; Last 500 Years; Barnes and Noble World; Complete World.

Read You Wouldn’t Want to be an American Pioneer, A Wilderness You’d Rather not Tame, Jacqueline Morley.

Mr. Marleys’ Main Street Confectionery, a History of Sweets and Treats, John J. Loeper.

Daily Life in a Covered Wagon, Paul Erickson.

Kids’ Discover: Wright Brothers.

Galloping Gertrude: By Motorcar in 1908, John J. Loeper.

If You Lived at the Time of the Great San Francisco Earthquake, Ellen Levine.

Student reading:
My Name is America: The Journal of Otto Peltonen, A Finnish Immigrant, William Durbin


Week 12
SOTW Ch. 17, Boxer Rebellion in China / Russo-Japanese War
SOTW Ch. 18, Europe and countries East/ Persia/ Balkans

History:
Read from Last 500 Years; Complete World; Historical Atlas.

Read more on the Empress Cixi from Herstory: Women Who Changed the World, editor Ruth Ashby, et al.

Read about the Russo-Japanese War battles from The Battle 100: The Stories Behind History’sMost Influential Battles, Michael Lee Lanning.

Re: the Balkans, read pertinent portions of 19th century histories from:
Czech Republic, Joann Milivojevic
Slovenia, Tamra Orr
Croatia, Martin Hintz
Life in War Torn Bosnia, Diane Yancey
Nations in Transition: Bulgaria, Steven Otfinoski

Lit.:
Tales of a Korean Grandmother, Frances Carpenter (good)

Student reading:
Sweet and Sour, Carol Kendall, et al


Week 13
SOTW Ch. 19, China, Vietnam, and France

History:
Read more about this time period from Cultures of the World: Vietnam, Audrey Seah.

Lit.:
Caddie Woodlawn, Carol Brink (good)
Ties that Bind, Ties that Break, Lensey Namioka
Rachel’s Journal, Marissa Moss (good)
In the Face of Danger, Jean Nixon

Student reading:
The Young Collector’s Illustrated Classics: Moby Dick, Herman Melville
Aesop’s Fables, Illustrated Junior Library, Fritz Kredel, illustrator


Week 14
SOTW Ch. 20, Mexican Revolution / World War I

History:
Read more about WWI from Haywood’s Historical Atlas of the 20th Century; Complete World; Last 500 Years; Barnes and Noble World; U.S. at War (Scholastic).

Read A Soldier’s Life, Andrew Robertshaw.
Pioneers of Science: Louis Pasteur, Nina Morgan
Clara Barton, Kathleen Deady

Read about WWI, the Treaty of Versailles, and Wilson’s 14 Points from A Young Reader’s Companion.

Read from American Women of Medicine, Russell Roberts, re: Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton and the Red Cross.

Listened to Clara Barton: founder of the American Red Cross, Christin Ditchfield.

Lit.:
Poem: The Women who Went to the Field, Clara Barton

Student reading:
Elizabeth Blackwell, The First Woman Doctor, Francene Sabin
Louis Pasteur, Carol Greene (Rookie Biography)
Usborne Famous Lives: Winsto Churchill, Katie Daynes
In Flander’s Field, John McCrae (poem)


Week 15
SOTW Ch. 21, Russian Revolution / End of World War I

History:
Read more on the Russian Revolution from Haywood’s 20th Century Atlas; Complete World; Barnes and Noble World; Last 500 Years.

Lit.:
The Wind in the Willows, Kenneth Grahame (good)
The Singing Tree, Kate Seredy (great)

Student reading:
The Great Migration, Jacob Lawrence
Ghost Canoe, Will Hobbs
Escape from the Ice, Shackleton and the Endurance, Connie and Peter Roop
Titanic, Mark Dubowski
Titanic, Victoria Sherrow
Antarctic Adventure, Meredith Hooper


Week 16
SOTW Ch. 22, Easter Uprising in Ireland / Home Rule for India

History:
Read more on above topics from Complete World and Barnes and Noble World.

Read Places and People: The Indian Subcontinent, Anita Ganeri.

Read The Panama Canal, Scott Ingram.

Lit.:
Daughter of the Mountains, Louise Rankin (terrific!)

Student reading:
Gandhi, Demi


Week 17
SOTW Ch. 23, Peace of Versailles/ Rise of Stalin
SOTW Ch. 24, New King in Egypt / Rise of Fascism in Europe

History:
Read more on Fascism from Last 500 Years; Barnes and Noble World; Complete World.

Read from The Truth About History re: “The Real Reason why the Lusitania Sank”; “The Comical Farce of the Russian Revolution”; “Typhoid Mary: The Cook with the Touch of Death”; “Scott of the Antarctic Should have Lived”; and “In the Deadly Care of Florence Nightingale”.

Lit.:
Thornton Burgess: The Adventures of Grandfather Frog (always great!)

Student reading:
You Want Women to Vote, Lizzie Stanton? Jean Fritz
Anderson’s Fairy Tales, Illustrator: Arthur Szyk (Illustrated Junior Library)
The Day of Ahmed’s Secret


Week 18
SOTW Ch. 25, Chinese Revolution and the Long March

History:
Read more from B&N World; Last 500 Years; Complete World.
Read China’s Long March, Fritz.

Lit.:
The House of Sixty Fathers, Meindert Dejong (good)

Student reading:
Homesick, Jean Fritz (autobiographical)


Week 19
SOTW Ch. 26, U.S. Stock Market Crash and Great Depression

History:
Read more from Last 500 Years; B&N World; Complete World.
Read Chapter 6 in Making of America.
Read from The Great Depression, R. G. Grant.

Lit.:
The Amazing Thinking Machine, Dennis Haseley
Esperanza Rising, Pam Munoz Ryan (good)

Student reading:
Bud, not Buddy, Christopher Paul Curtis
Flying Ace: The Story of Amelia Earhart, Angela Bull


Week 20
SOTW Ch. 27, Spanish Civil War / Rise of Hitler

Lit.:
My Friend, the Enemy, J. B. Cheaney (very good)

Student reading:
Toro! Toro! Michael Morpugo
Peter Pan, J. M. Barrie (Dandelion)


and continued again....

#17 mcconnellboys

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 09:36 PM

Week 21
SOTW Ch. 28, WWII / Holocaust

History:
Read from Complete World; Last 500 Years; B&N World; 20th Century Atlas.
Read Jesse Owens, Champion Athlete, Rick Rennert.

Lit.:
Number the Stars, Lois Lowry (good)

Student reading:
Anne Frank: A Life in Hiding, Johanna Hurwitz
Usborne Famous Lives: Adolf Hitler, Katie Daynes
Twenty and Ten, Claire Bishop


Week 22
Continuing with WWII

History:
Life in the Hitler Youth, Jennifer Keeley
Hiding from the Nazis, David Adler
Auschwitz, the Story of a Nazi Death Camp, Clive Lawton
Hiroshima, the Story of the First Atom Bomb, Clive Lawton
Read from Nazi Germany: The Face of Tyranny, Ted Gottfried.

Lit.:
Anne Frank, Josephine Poole

Student reading:
Hiroshima, Laurence Yep
Mieko and the Fifth Treasure, Eleanor Coerr
Hitler’s Daughter, Jackie French (he liked this)

Week 23
SOTW Ch. 29, End of WWII

History:
Read from Historical Atlas.
Read The United Nations, Ann Armbruster.
Watched parts of “Jehovah’s Witnesses Stand Firm Against Nazi Assault” and “Purple Triangles” (JW’s had to wear these; like the Jewish stars).
Read about WWII soldier from A Soldier’s Life, Andrew Robertshaw.

Lit.:
Rhymes and Verses, Collected Poems for Young People, Walter de la Mare

Student reading:
World War II Heroes, Ten True Tales, Allan Zullo (good)
The Gadget, Paul Zindel


Week 24
SOTW Ch. 30, Partitioning of India / Palestine

History:
Read from Last 500 Years; Complete World; B&N World; Historical Atlas.
Read from People at Odds: India and Pakistan, Heather Wagner.
Read from People at Odds: Israel and the Arab World, Heather Wagner.

Lit.:
Habibi, Naomi Shihab Nye (Palestinian-Americans who move back to Israel in about 1970’s)

Student reading:
Neela, Victory Song, Chitra Divakaruni
Memories of Survival, Esther Krinitz, et al
Shin’s Tricycle, Tatsuharu Kodama (this is a “simple” picture book about the very complex subject of the bombing of Hiroshima - it’s hard for me to read it; you should pre-read)


Week 25
SOTW Ch. 31, Suez Canal/Crisis / Berlin Wall/Airlift/Iron Curtain

History:
Read from New Perspectives: The Berlin Wall, R. G. Grant.
Read from Historical Atlas.
Read Suez Canal, Modern Wonders of the World, Valerie Bodden.

Lit.:
Peter Rabbit Stories, Thornton Burgess
The Classic Treasury of Children’s Poetry, Egan, editor

Student reading:
Pinocchio (Dandelion)
Alice in Wonderland (Dandelion)


Week 26
SOTW Ch. 32, Africa After WWII / Communist China

History:
Read from Enchantment of the World: Swaziland.
Read Witness to History: Apartheid in South Africa, David Downing.

Lit.:
Warriors, Warthogs, and Wisdom, Growing up in Africa, Lyall Watson (excellent)
Journey to Jo’burg, Beverley Naidoo (good)
Out of Bounds: Seven Stories of Conflict and Hope, Beverly Naidoo

Student reading:
Heidi (Dandelion)
Rookie Biography: Nelson Mandela, Karima Grant
Nelson Mandela and the Quest for Freedom, Brian Feinberg


Week 27
SOTW Ch. 33, Korean and Vietnam Wars

History:
Looked through info. in The U.S. at War (Scholastic).
Read The Korean War, Carter Smith.
Read We the People: The Korean War, Andrew Santella.

Student reading:
Reader’s Digest Best Loved Books for Young Readers: Great Cases of Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Spies and Spying, Mike Potter


Week 28
SOTW Ch. 34, Argentina under Peron / Freedom for Belgian Congo

History:
Read from Lives of Extraordinary Women, Kathleen Krull, re: Eva Peron.
Read about Eva Peron from Herstory, Ruth Ashby and Deborah Ohrn.
Read A Walk through a Rain Forest, David and Mark Jenike (Life in the Ituri Forest of Zaire - very good!)

Lit.:
Tuck-me-in-Tales, Margaret MacDonald, read stories from Chile and Argentina
The Barefoot Book of Fairytales, Malachy Doyle, read story from Argentina
Traveling to Tondo, a tale of the Nkundo of Zaire, Verna Aardema
Rickie and Henri, Alan Marks (Jane Goodall Society)
Monkey for Sale, Janna Stanley
Monkey Business, Shirley Climo, read select stories from the Congo region, and others….

Student reading:
The Amelia Bedelia Treasury, Peggy Parish
Tuck Everlasting, Natalie Babbit


Week 29
SOTW Ch. 35, Space Race/Cold War/ Cuban Missile Crisis

History:
Read On the Front Line: Spying and the Cold War, Michael Burgan.
Read The Cuban Missile Crisis, Fred Cook.
Read Cuba: After the Revolution, Bernard Wolf (good).

Lit.:
The Fire-eaters, David Almond (Cuban Missile Crisis, sorta…..)

Student reading:
Horrible Harry Goes to the Moon, Suzy Kline
The Incredible Journey, Sheila Burnford
Footprints on the Moon, Alexandra Siy
I Want to be an Astronaut, Maze Productions


Week 30
SOTW Ch. 36, Kennedy Assassination / Civil Rights Movement

History:
Read more from Last 500 Years; B&N World.
Read Chapter 7 of The Making of America.
Read Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott, Teresa Gelsi
Read If You Lived at the Time of Martin Luther King, Ellen Levine.
Read From The Assassination of MLK, Jr., Jacqueline Ching (re: Ray and conspiracy theories; aftermath for movement).

Lit.:
Remember: The Journey to School Integration, Toni Morrison
Linda Brown, You are Not Alone, Joyce Carol Thomas

Student reading:
DK, Free at Last! The Story of Martin Luther King, Jr., Angela Bull
Great African Americans: Martin Luther King, Jr., Man of Peace, Patricia and Fredrick McKissack
Rosa Parks, Muriel Dubois
A Mouse called Wolf, Dick King-Smith
Meet Martin Luther King, Jr., James T. Dekay
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., David A. Adler


Week 31
SOTW Ch. 37, Wars re: Israel / Vietnam War

History:
Read more from Last 500 Years; B&N World; Complete World; Historical Atlas; continued Making of America, Ch. 7.
Read about the Vietnam War from The U.S. at War (Scholastic).
Read African Americans in the Vietnam War, Diane Canwell and Jon Sutherland.
Read Places and People, Southeast Asia, Anita Ganeri.
Read Voices From the Past, Vietnam War, Kathlyn and Martin Gay.
Read from Israel, An Illustrated History, Daniel Schroeter.

Lit.:
Water Buffalo Days, Huynh Quang Nhuong

Student reading:
Patrol, An American Soldier in Vietnam, Walter Dean Myers
The Land I Lost: Adventures of a Boy in Vietnam, Huynh Quang Nhuong


Week 32
SOTW Ch. 38, End of Cold War Conflicts / Rise of Terrorism

History:
Read Ch. 8, Making of America.
Read from Enchantment of the World, Afghanistan, re: its attempted takeover by Russia and events since.
Read Chapter on Brezhnev Era from The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union, John Matthews.
Read Hamas: Palestinian Terrorists, Maxine Rosaler (good).

Lit.:
The Breadwinner, Deborah Ellis (good)
Parvana’s Journey, Deborah Ellis (both are excellent; hard to read; sad)

Student reading:
Afghanistan, Bob Italia
Afghanistan, Many Cultures, One World, Barbara Knox


Week 33
SOTW Ch. 39, India / Iraq

History:
Read from Cultures of the World: Iraq, Susan Hassig, et al re: independence in 1932; military coups; Iran-Iraq War; Gulf Wars; terrorism and government.
Read Indira Gandhi, Trevor Fishlock.

Student reading:
Great Illustrated Classics: The War of the Worlds, H. G. Wells


Week 34
SOTW Ch. 40, Nuclear Power / Chernobyl / Three Mile Island / Reagan

History:
Read Ronald Reagan: From Silver Screen to Oval Office, Time for Kids, editor Denise Patrick.
Read The Picture Life of Ronald Reagan, Don Lawson.
Read The Chernobyl Catastrophe, Graham Rickard.
Read from Last 500 Years; B&N World; Complete World; Historical Atlas.

Student reading:
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mark Twain, Reader’s Digest Best-loved Books for Young Readers


Week 35
SOTW Ch. 41, Cultural Revolution in China / End of Communism in Russia

History:
Read more on Afghani people and culture from Enchantment of the World: Afghanistan.
Red Land, Yellow River, Ange Zhang (great - very powerful)
Read from Historical Atlas re: end of communism, etc.

Student reading:
Swiss Family Robinson, Illustrated Junior Library


Week 36
SOTW Ch. 42, End of 20th Century and issues

History:
Read from B&N World; Complete World; Last 500 Years re: end of 20th century and issues: computer tech, satellites, International Space Station, UN policing of the world, Saddam Hussein, first Gulf War, etc.
Read Persian Gulf War, Kathlyn and Martin Gay.
Read Meltdown: A Race Against Nuclear Disaster at Three Mile Island, A Reporter’s Story, Wilborn Hampton (includes section on Chernobyl).

Student reading:
Getting to Know the U.S. Presidents: Ronald Reagan, Mike Venezia

#18 dee67p

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 03:37 PM

I'm trying to finish SOTW3 in August with Lewis and Clark next week. Then Mexico and S America. Then Trail of Tears and Alaska chapter. SO< then I'll be ready to plow into SOTW4 and I've no IDEA how I was going to squish chapters! NO IDEA! You've heard of "flying by the seat of your pants" right? Well, not after this thread. You are really AMAZINGLY BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE! I just hadn't found anything on Hannah's help yahoo group and just didn't know how. But now, THANKS BUNCHES!

#19 momto4girls

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 04:30 PM

Regena - thank you so much for posting!!!!

#20 mamakelly

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 10:41 PM

If you want to see it I'd be happy to email it to you, it's in excel so I don't think I can easily attach it here.


I also have a big fact SOTW 4 plan I can send you. :)


I'm in the same boat, using SOTW 4 this year! I'd love to see what you ladies put together. It would be great to not have to create it all myself :001_smile:

#21 tuesdayschild

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 11:08 PM

We've finished our first draft for SOTW4 and are allowing 38-39 weeks, spreading out a few areas, you can see what we have so far over here at HSlaunch. (Zoom down to the last page once you have the schedule open, it has our end notes/comments explain what we're 'planning' on doing.)

barefootmeandering has a 'bare bones' schedule here which has things squished - just scroll down to the last set of schedules.

Happy scheduling :)

Edited by tuesdayschild, 11 August 2010 - 11:11 PM.


#22 tuesdayschild

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 02:58 PM

Here is another SOTW4 schedule , just found .. like the listings for each level:)

Classical house of learning

#23 dcjlkplus3

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 04:19 PM

How do you decide which chapters to drop?

My oldest is only almost 9, so this is our 1st time through this time period.
I'm not sure what will really interest her.

Should I just sit with my husband and decide together which chapters to drop?

Should I just drop the chapters we don't really like any of the additional activities for?

I think we will still plan on listening to whatever chapters we end of dropping. I KNOW we can't cover all of history, and I don't want history to be frentic - I just hate the idea of delibrately not covering something.

#24 EKS

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 04:25 PM

I eliminated the problem by deciding not to use SOTW 4.

#25 Oakblossoms

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 07:25 PM

I wouldn't drop anything. If you must get it into 36 weeks, just pick a few chapters and make them read only. Now notebook pages or anything:tongue_smilie:

#26 Oakblossoms

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 07:30 PM

Regena - thank you so much for posting!!!!


Thanks. I love using someone else's wheel;)

#27 Aubrey

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 10:02 AM

How do you decide which chapters to drop?
Which chapters do you drool over when you read the title? Schedule those, maybe? Then fill in as much other stuff as you can?
My oldest is only almost 9, so this is our 1st time through this time period.
Me, too.
I'm not sure what will really interest her.
I don't think it's really possible to guess this. While she might *know* she'd be interested in one part, the whole point of ed is to introduce her to the other parts, to help her find the full spectrum of her interests (& to better educate her on the other stuff anyway!)
Should I just sit with my husband and decide together which chapters to drop?
That's what I did. Only...I think he was watching tv, I'd mention what I was dropping, & he'd say "mmm-hmm." Which is better than when he was *really* giving me his opinion (as a history major): DO IT ALL!!!! (because he was excited)
Should I just drop the chapters we don't really like any of the additional activities for?
That's a way of choosing.
I think we will still plan on listening to whatever chapters we end of dropping. I KNOW we can't cover all of history, and I don't want history to be frentic - I just hate the idea of delibrately not covering something.

That's a great idea!

#28 dcjlkplus3

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 10:09 AM

I had a thought last night - I'll have to work with it more, but, so far...

What if instead of doing a chapter a week (or so), we just do a section a day? There doesn't seem to always be a lot of connection between the 2 sections in each chapter and if we do history 3 days a week for 36 that gives us 108 days to do 84 sections of history. that gives a little bit of "extra" time and since we were doing history 4 days a week last year we could make a fourth day of the week for tests/activites.

Oh, this might just work!

#29 cschnee

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 02:41 PM

I do the opposite to all of you who suggest dropping chapters. I take two weeks to do one chapter (ie each section is one week). We do history in the afternoons for 2 hrs/2x per week. I've added in movies, books, websites and activities for most of the chapters. Some of the chapters I've combined the two sections into one week, but that's because I couldn't find any good websites or activities to do with those chapers. I'll take us 4 years to do sotw 4 and it is in conjunction with Canadian history and Canadian geography. If anyone would like to see my schedule, I'd be happy to share. Just let me know.

#30 cschnee

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 02:43 PM

PS I'd love to see all those other sotw 4 schedules, especially if there are web sties, activities, other books (than swb suggests) and movies!

#31 Catherine

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 02:57 PM

I have a fourth and an eighth grader, and the elder has been through SOTW 4 once already. For him, it will be a quicky background intro, if even that. I plan to use a combination of literature and primary sources for him. It was the "neo-confederates" thread that got me more interested in using documents as a primary means of exploring history for this logic stage kid, but I digress.

We are not history buffs here. I do my best to spice it up, and dh, a former history major, adds his two cents whenever he can. But I prefer to hit all the topics, even if that just means listening, discussing a bit, and moving on. I think exposure to a broader scope of world history is more important to me at the grammar stage than depth, particularly given my ds's lack of strong interest in the subject.

#32 branycbur

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 02:06 PM

I just finished putting together my plans (we start school in September here). If you want, I can send that to you. It's an excel doc. We are doing it in one year because she will touch on these topics again in 8th grade and 12th grade.

#33 dragons in the flower bed

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 02:41 PM

My fifth grader is doing SOTW4 right now. He's only reading and doing a brief summation, but he's doing it almost every day. I scheduled by subtopic.

I don't know that I'm being clear. I'll show you.

http://www.welltrain...&pictureid=1771

We've only just begun, but I like that he's doing a summation of each subtopic. That requires him to think about each instead of breezing through a chapter with a bunch of information in it.

I could remove the other stuff and send the SOTW plan if you want, but I haven't formally scheduled any extra readings because my kid likes history and read a ton of books on this era last year.

Edited by dragons in the flower bed, 19 August 2010 - 02:43 PM.


#34 dragons in the flower bed

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 02:44 PM

I've grouped ch's into unit studies, to allow greater depth on some subjects.


Wow. That is awesome. I am filing that one away.

#35 AngelBee

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 10:00 PM

You all rock! I suddenly feel like a little girl looking up to a bunch of homeschool heros! :D

#36 Adriana E.

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 10:28 AM

I am new in the forum and trying to put together a curriculum for 3rd, 7th and 8th grade, I don´t understand the abbreviations WTM, SOTW, WWE, FLL, .. can you tell me what they are please?

#37 Halcyon

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 10:35 AM

I'm planning on taking 2 years with SOTW 4. I'm using the list I saw on Paula's Archives to incorporate Hakim's history books plus tons of readers. Usborne has a bunch of WW 1 and 2 books for this age range. This is such a rich time period, I do not want to rush it.



do you have a link to this? thanks.

#38 Jennefer@SSA

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 03:10 PM

I am new in the forum and trying to put together a curriculum for 3rd, 7th and 8th grade, I don´t understand the abbreviations WTM, SOTW, WWE, FLL, .. can you tell me what they are please?


WTM= The Well Trained Mind
SOTW= Story of the World
WWE = Writing with Ease
FLL = First Language Lessons

You can find what all the abbreviations mean in the sticky at the top of the forum. :) Welcome!

#39 Jennefer@SSA

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 03:13 PM

I agonized over what to do with SOTW 4 and in the end decided to do it and do it all but at an accelerated pace. We covered SOTW 4 in 21 weeks and have spent the remainder of this year covering state history.

It has been a wonderful year for us and SOTW 4 served us very well. :) Here is the blog post I did that explains more about our reasons why we chose this route, which chapters we covered each week along with supplemental books we read.

#40 JadeOrchidSong

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 04:46 PM

I'm planning on taking 2 years with SOTW 4. I'm using the list I saw on Paula's Archives to incorporate Hakim's history books plus tons of readers. Usborne has a bunch of WW 1 and 2 books for this age range. This is such a rich time period, I do not want to rush it.

That is what I plan to do, incorporating Hakim's history books. Thanks!


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