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#1 kathkath

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 06:38 PM

My four-year-old son got in *trouble* at tae kwon do today and as a punishment had to do a 4yo version of a pushup--balance on his toes with his feet together and his hands shoulder width apart, with his bottom in the air--for about 15 or 20 seconds. He was in trouble for not focusing when doing jumping jacks. 2x when the master said to do 10 pushups (once as a class and a second time solo), he got carried away and did 11. I really don't think he was being silly. He just forgets in the middle of things what the point is lol. Anyhow he is going to a traditional tae kwon do place--the guy graduated from the taekwondo university there. He's the real deal.

Anyhow, I have no problem with him being *punished* that way there, this is what we signed up for and is supposed to be great at teaching self-discipline and focus. The master is respectful. My thought is hmmmmmm, maybe this might be more effective than time-out at home? I saw an episode of "world's strictest parents' where a former marine used physical exercises like that as punishment--but in the show it was implied that it taught persistence, focus, and determination. It also seems like a good emotional outlet. Anyhow, my mind is a-turning about this one and I was curious to hear the hive's thoughts about this. I had never considered this a form of discipline before.

#2 Perry

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 06:43 PM

Pushups and jumping jacks worked well for discipline here. I also had the kids do jumping jacks or run around the house a few times not so much for discipline, but for working off some of their energy when they would get a little squirrely.

Much better than timeouts, IMO.

#3 transientChris

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 06:46 PM

We do sit ups (or curls), push-ups and jumping jacks. Works much better than time outs and we still use them with teenagers after warnings.

#4 golfcartmama

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 06:46 PM

Mine run the stairs. They only think it's fun for the first 2-3 times, then they're ready to stop! If they complain, I add to it.

#5 Amy Jo

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 06:48 PM

I've had my kids do these. I would prefer they carry in wood, but as its spring/summer the wood isn't split. I think something active helps them to refocus better than just sitting in a corner. As if my 4 yo could sit still! I've also "made" them jump 100 times on the trampoline if they get to bouncy indoors.
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#6 smrtmama

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 06:53 PM

Your son is awfully young for push-ups as a disciplinary method. Our son's PT was adamant that kids that age need to be very carefully instructed in proper form for push-ups and that even then, most will do it wrong and do more harm to their bodies than good. We have him run laps instead.

#7 homeschoolally

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 06:59 PM

We use pushups for discipline here--works very well for us! I never used it with a child that young before...you might find an similar alternative until he is a little older. :001_smile: Can't think of one now, but maybe you'll get some suggestions---deep squats possibly??? Look forward to hearing some other ideas.

Edited by homeschoolally, 17 June 2010 - 07:02 PM.


#8 smrtmama

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 07:00 PM

I'll add that we DID use push-ups as a disciplinary technique and I'm not philosophically averse to it. I just see the potential concerns after having the physiology explained by the PT.

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 07:11 PM

Ok, I'll be the odd one out here...

I can't stand the idea of using exercise as a punishment. For two reasons.

First, I think it puts a bad 'link', if you will, in a child's brain, that exercise equals punishment. Exercise should be something we do to keep our body healthy. It can even be fun! (Or so I've been told. :tongue_smilie: ) Seriously though, I kinda liken it to using food as a reward. Food isn't a reward, it's how we nourish our body.

Secondly, and more personally, I have a very bad memory associated with using exercise as punishment. I have this vivid memory of my stepmother screaming at my little sister while she was doing sit ups. Apparently my little sister had done something to earn a punishment from my stepmother, who decided that my sister should do sit ups for the punishment 'because she was so fat'. My sister could not have been over 12 years old at the time. She likely was 9 or 10. My stepmother, once she 'discovered' this form of punishment, used it as a way to belittle and embarrass my sister.

So I guess I'm in the 'no exercises as punishment' camp, if one exists. :tongue_smilie:

Edited by bethanyniez, 17 June 2010 - 07:26 PM.


#10 Pink Fairy

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 07:23 PM

I don't like it for a 4yo. We will do jumping jacks to work off energy, but I agree with Bethany that associating exercise with something negative like punishment is a bad idea, especially at this age.

#11 Farrar

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 07:26 PM

A cousin of mine uses her trampoline as the punishment for the kids. I see why some people are against any physical exercise as punishment because it creates a negative link in the kids' minds. I think using copying lines or reading as a punishment can raise the same concerns. However, I can also see a greater connection in that the kid is exerting energy in a negative way so the idea behind the punishment is to have him/her exert it in a positive way - to work it out and calm down. I feel like the trampoline is an especially nice one because it seems to me that it would really meet that sort of goal.

That said, we don't use it here per se. I try to have all consequences be immediate and directly connected to the action. If the action was being rowdy inappropriately (like, next to the TV or on top of my pile of papers...) then I might separate the kids and make them go run around the backyard or up and down the block to work out that energy in a different way. Alas, we have no trampoline and no room for one. But if it was hitting each other or something, then I wouldn't - the connection would be too tenuous for the kids to really get it.

#12 smrtmama

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 07:29 PM

First, I think it puts a bad 'link', if you will, in a child's brain, that exercise equals punishment.


When we have my oldest run, we make sure he knows its because his excess energy is making it impossible for him to sit still or mind or speak to us nicely. Joint compression is great for those easily over-stimulated kids. I think physical discipline is a really good thing, but it has to be presented as a way to help you snap back to your rational mind, not as a punishment for being bad.

I like to view it as a tool for him to get control of his behavior, not a punishment for us to get control of it.

#13 Pamela H in Texas

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 07:32 PM

I will agree with Bethany and for the same reason (exercise should be a positive, not a negative). It shouldn't be punishment.

HOWEVER, that doesn't mean it can't be used with discipline. There is a difference. For example, I am VERY big on making sure kids get PLENTY of exercise and sensory input so as to improve behavior. Scheduling exercise breaks, having fun with it, can help tremendously with instruction whether discipline or academics. The ONLY thing more helpful for aiding learning than exercise is WATER. I even would give my son the choice of something physical or schoolwork at times believing he could tell what his body needed. I would rather give him 20 minutes to walk a mile or so before math that takes 15 minutes than to fight his physical needs making math last an hour.

Additionally, I think it is good to teach children to use exercise (as well as things like "time out") in order to help themselves (I don't use time out punitively either). Many times when people are upset or need to think, they take a run or exercise or go lie on the bed for a few minutes or whatever. These are GOOD life skills and HEALTHY. I think using it punitively discourages the healthy use by children.

JMO, of course. I wouldn't use it at home (though I didn't mind when my kids did it at sports).

#14 LibraryLover

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 07:32 PM

He's 4.

I would be put of there in a heartbeat.

Out TKD instructor (born and trained in South Korea) never did this sort of 'punishment' with little kids.

Edited by LibraryLover, 18 June 2010 - 11:49 AM.


#15 2cents

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 07:33 PM

I used pushups on the girls when they were younger. I'm a black belt and in our classes we assigned pushups for misbehavior or goofing off. :)

#16 BMW

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 08:02 PM

Push ups were used by our tennis coach with kids about 10 yrs and up. She laughed with them, making it fun, but it was often tied to disciplinary measures.

I have used them when a child gets into a habit and just stops thinking. For example, a son kept coming in and kicking his shoes off in the living room and leaving them in the middle of the floor. I hate that. We have too many people here to just have shoes on the floor. After being told many times to not do this and to keep his shoes in his closet, I just started having him do 10 push ups each time he "forgot". It worked great. Not only that, but he realized that he was fairly weak and would go into his room and work on push ups to impress me!! It was SO cute when he showed me how great he could do push ups. For me, it works if you are not yelling or mad, emotional, etc. and if you keep it fun. Actually, when I randomly use push ups for discipline, the boys get all excited and join in with the offender!

#17 Parrothead

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 08:12 PM

I can see something like laps, push-ups or jumping jacks during a sport including TKD as a discipline measure.

I'm not so sure about it at home. On the home front I agree with Bethany.

#18 Heather in Neverland

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 08:37 PM

Our TKD instructors used push-ups for discipline all the time. Very common.

#19 susankenny

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 08:41 PM

Hi,

My kids are 8 & 6. They get pebbles in a jar & each pebble represents a lap they have to run around the yard at the end of the week. They are given a warning first though (there are a couple of exceptions to the "warning first", but for the most part, they always have a chance to not receive a pebble). Every Saturday, they have to work off their pebbles in the jar. They have quickly learned that running laps is tiring, and it really has helped them with re-thinking their behavior after the initial warning. It also eliminates my urge to yell if I get upset, so for us, it has worked very well. It definitely beats a time-out imho.


Susan

#20 IsabelC

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 08:55 PM

When we have my oldest run, we make sure he knows its because his excess energy is making it impossible for him to sit still or mind or speak to us nicely. Joint compression is great for those easily over-stimulated kids. I think physical discipline is a really good thing, but it has to be presented as a way to help you snap back to your rational mind, not as a punishment for being bad.

I like to view it as a tool for him to get control of his behavior, not a punishment for us to get control of it.

Yep, that. If you present it as a punishment, it will not only make him feel resentful but also teach him that physical exercise is nasty and to be avoided if possible (not a lesson you want to teach given the concerns about obesity). But if you can present it as a way to expend surplus energy and recenter himself ready to concentrate on something, then it might be helpful.

#21 hazilsara

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 08:56 PM

We use pushups for discipline here--works very well for us! I never used it with a child that young before...you might find an similar alternative until he is a little older. :001_smile: Can't think of one now, but maybe you'll get some suggestions---deep squats possibly??? Look forward to hearing some other ideas.



Try wall squats! We use physical exercise as punishment regularly...I figure realistically he's supposed to be doing it anyway, for PE; why not use it to my advantage?? And I learned the wall squats idea from a girl friend with 3 boys ranging from 4-8 yo! They stand against the wall, then lower into a sitting position, things parallel to the ground, with feet out far enough so their shins are perpendicular to the ground; arms out in front of them. You can start by having them hold for 30 seconds, then work up to 3 minutes or so...it is painful, but very good for the muscles!! And definitely a good deterant to future mis-behavior!!

Also, keep in mind Dr. Guffanti suggests more aerobic type exercise if the kids are falling asleep and something more sedate when they're acting hyper. This is counter-intuative, but he swears by it! :001_huh: Seems to work with my ds11!

Good Luck!!

#22 smrtmama

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 08:56 PM

Yep, that. If you present it as a punishment, it will not only make him feel resentful but also teach him that physical exercise is nasty and to be avoided if possible (not a lesson you want to teach given the concerns about obesity). But if you can present it as a way to expend surplus energy and recenter himself ready to concentrate on something, then it might be helpful.


What I love about it is how Captain Science starts every single run so PO'd at us for making him run, and every single time he comes in with a sweet disposition, telling me, "I had a great run!"

#23 lisamarie

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 08:57 PM

I do this with only my DS at this point because he is my kid that when he acts up, it's because he needs to get out his energy. I usually have him run laps around the house, but occasionally I do have him do 15 sit ups, pushups and jumping jacks. He thinks it's fun and asks to do more. I don't do it as a punishment, I only use it when he's starting to get out of control and obviously needs to work off some steam.

Some days I just kick him out of the house and he rides his scooter up and down the street for a half hour and that does the same thing.

#24 Harriet Vane

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 09:07 PM

Ok, I'll be the odd one out here...

I can't stand the idea of using exercise as a punishment. For two reasons.

First, I think it puts a bad 'link', if you will, in a child's brain, that exercise equals punishment. Exercise should be something we do to keep our body healthy. It can even be fun! (Or so I've been told. :tongue_smilie: ) Seriously though, I kinda liken it to using food as a reward. Food isn't a reward, it's how we nourish our body.

Secondly, and more personally, I have a very bad memory associated with using exercise as punishment. I have this vivid memory of my stepmother screaming at my little sister while she was doing sit ups. Apparently my little sister had done something to earn a punishment from my stepmother, who decided that my sister should do sit ups for the punishment 'because she was so fat'. My sister could not have been over 12 years old at the time. She likely was 9 or 10. My stepmother, once she 'discovered' this form of punishment, used it as a way to belittle and embarrass my sister.

So I guess I'm in the 'no exercises as punishment' camp, if one exists. :tongue_smilie:


I am truly sorry your stepmother was so awful with this. I dealt with belittling as a child as well, and it is truly damaging.

I do just want to point out though that the problem was not the exercise, but rather the verbal abuse, screaming, and belittling. Any punishment delivered in that way is inappropriate and wrong.

Personally, I am enthusiastic about using exercise as a discipline response and as an outlet for ds to get the wiggles out. The form of punishment for my dd really doesn't matter as she is one who is mortified at being in trouble. A good discipline response for her is anything that requires her to carefully think about what went wrong--because she has a very empathetic personality, she can identify this handily. My ds, on the other hand, needs the exercise because it calms him, works out the wiggles. Working off some steam for a few minutes gives him that mental/emotional space he needs to respond appropriately to whatever went wrong.

#25 OrganicAnn

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 09:08 PM

I wonder if boys and girls react to physical exercise as punishment differently. Does anyone have both boys and girls that they have tried it on? Was it different? The same?

#26 Laurie4b

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 09:32 PM

we do it here, but I did not start at age 4. More like mid-elementary school.

#27 lisamarie

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 09:56 PM

I have tried it on my DD, but it doesn't work for her. My DS often NEEDS a physical outlet when he's antsy, angry, etc. I am actually this way myself and have a punching bag for when I get really upset. But my DD just sees it as a time for major whining and crying and complaining. I think it's not so much a boy-girl thing, but a personality thing. I have always been like this. In college, I would get so frustrated with my school work that I would throw pillows and pens. I would go for runs. When I work out at the gym, I think about all the stuff I'm upset about and it makes me work out harder. I work out until I'm not upset anymore. And if I can't work out, I clean. Usually my kitchen floor. It requires lots of energy that gets my aggression out.

So I guess you could say that for some kids, physical punishment is actually a really good idea that is teaching them healthy ways to deal with their anger, antsyness, etc. One summer I was doing mission work in Detroit and I was just miserable and couldn't figure out why. Then my friend who was with me told me to start running around the field by our house and once I did, I was fine again. I just had to run a few laps every day.

#28 LibraryLover

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 09:58 PM

we do it here, but I did not start at age 4. More like mid-elementary school.



I think 4 is on the insane side. I'd also not send my kids to activites were punishemnt was part of the program. Kids can thrive and grow well without that.

#29 kathkath

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 10:00 PM

Try wall squats! We use physical exercise as punishment regularly...I figure realistically he's supposed to be doing it anyway, for PE; why not use it to my advantage?? And I learned the wall squats idea from a girl friend with 3 boys ranging from 4-8 yo! They stand against the wall, then lower into a sitting position, things parallel to the ground, with feet out far enough so their shins are perpendicular to the ground; arms out in front of them. You can start by having them hold for 30 seconds, then work up to 3 minutes or so...it is painful, but very good for the muscles!! And definitely a good deterant to future mis-behavior!!

Also, keep in mind Dr. Guffanti suggests more aerobic type exercise if the kids are falling asleep and something more sedate when they're acting hyper. This is counter-intuative, but he swears by it! :001_huh: Seems to work with my ds11!

Good Luck!!


HA HA HA HA HA you have me laughing out loud as counting it as PE. I just imagine logging the hours for the state requirement. :lol:

#30 kathkath

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 10:06 PM

Yep, that. If you present it as a punishment, it will not only make him feel resentful but also teach him that physical exercise is nasty and to be avoided if possible (not a lesson you want to teach given the concerns about obesity). But if you can present it as a way to expend surplus energy and recenter himself ready to concentrate on something, then it might be helpful.



I can see that, however I've always hated pushups anyhow so liking them is not high on my list of objectives.

ITA about the resentment piece.

I'm wondering about it as a tool for times such as when he refuses to get his shoes on or do a chore or something like that. Maybe it wouldn't be a punishment but a choice: "Would you prefer to do X or do a pushup and then do X?" Thinking aloud here. THis has me scratching my chin.

My son is also very intense in his reactions, good and bad, and we're continually trying to get him to react more calmly. So I wonder if doing pushups or jumping could help? He just turned 4 recently. He is not officially *homeschooled* yet. I am more concerned about general family life--the basics like getting dressed, out the door, to the table, handling disappointments, etc. He has a very short fuse. It's so short I wonder if it even exists lol.

#31 smrtmama

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 10:19 PM

I can see that, however I've always hated pushups anyhow so liking them is not high on my list of objectives.

ITA about the resentment piece.

I'm wondering about it as a tool for times such as when he refuses to get his shoes on or do a chore or something like that. Maybe it wouldn't be a punishment but a choice: "Would you prefer to do X or do a pushup and then do X?" Thinking aloud here. THis has me scratching my chin.

My son is also very intense in his reactions, good and bad, and we're continually trying to get him to react more calmly. So I wonder if doing pushups or jumping could help? He just turned 4 recently. He is not officially *homeschooled* yet. I am more concerned about general family life--the basics like getting dressed, out the door, to the table, handling disappointments, etc. He has a very short fuse. It's so short I wonder if it even exists lol.


4 really is too young, IMO, for pushups -- disciplinary, health wise, etc. I'd try having him go on a spring around your house or up and down the driveway. It really, really helps with that short fuse. Running clears and centers the mind.

#32 Aubrey

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 10:21 PM

Oh my gosh, I just read the title of this thread wrong. I was thinking booKshelves...& as a punishment? What kind of medeival torture...wait. *Push ups.*

:leaving:

#33 zbargainmama

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 10:24 PM

I think it is great! I was a gymnastics coach and that was the form of discipline in the gym all the time. I never even thought about implementing it at home. Hmmm, I see a new consequence on the horizon;)

#34 transientChris

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 10:30 PM

All my kids like physical exercise but none like situps or pushups. They didn't like them before they were punishments. They still don't like them. But it hasn't stopped our girls from doing sports or being active. THey actually prefer it as a punishment over many other kinds.

#35 myfunnybunch

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 10:38 PM

My kids do pushups in their martial arts classes, even the 5 y.o., if they stop listening or start distracting everyone around them by being goofy.The teachers give the pushups matter-of-factly and the boys re-join the group immediately.

But they do pushups as a part of class too, so it's more natural than doing pushups in, say, art class.

Done properly, it's just a way to help the boys re-focus. It's direct, it's short, it breaks the behavior cycle that's causing them to be silly or not listen, and there's not a lot of talking at them.

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#36 Anne

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 11:04 PM

I never assigned pushups, but I used to send one of my dds out to run up and down the driveway 10 times. She'd say, "I don't WANT to run up and down the driveway"! I'd say, "I didn't ask you if you wanted to - I just said DO IT"!

Usually at that point, she needed a break from me and I needed a break from her. And it worked - she'd come in calmer, more ready to listen, and I'd come back calmer, more ready to be patient and listen to her.

To this day (and she's 25 now), when she gets really stressed, she goes out for a walk - and comes back calmer, ready to take on the problem!!

It was a life skill I was teaching - not discipline! I just didn't know it at the time!! :D

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#37 annandatje

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 11:09 PM

Forced exercise is a form of corporal punishment. I would prefer to organize the day so that the child and his family have ample opportunity to work off excess energy instead of waiting until child is disruptive and mete out punishment.

In the martial arts setting, what connection does the forced exercise have to the infraction? Why not explain to child what he did that was out of line and give constructive suggestions on how to deal with his situation?

Exercise is an appropriate and necessary component of building and maintaining physical fitness but not appropriate as a punishment in my opinion.

#38 nestof3

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 11:32 PM

Maybe I should punish myself. For everytime I lose my temper, I do pushups and situps. :)

But, no, I don't think I could use it as a punishment for misbehavior around the house. I can see doing something active when needing a break, but then we'd all do it, as I could use it as much as the boys.

Edited by nestof3, 17 June 2010 - 11:36 PM.


#39 Truscifi

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 11:33 PM

At our dojo the kids do pushups as part of class, but also if they start getting rowdy or unfocused. It helps get them back on track. Truth be told, sensei uses them in my class sometimes too. :D

At home we exercise as practice for karate class (usually before a belt test) or to practice a new skill. Also, ds generally responds to time outs pretty well, but every once in a while he gets so worked up that he has a total meltdown. When that happens we send him out to run laps with the dog. It gives him a chance to work off some of his frustration and clear his head. When he comes in he finishes his timeout, since that was his 'discipline' - the running was just a way to help him unwind.

BTW, ds is 6 now, but started martial arts when he was 4. When he was in the younger class they only did 2 or 3 pushups at a time. He now does 5, and in the next class up they do 10. The adults typically have to do 20. Also, every new person starting the school is taught how to do a proper pushup.

#40 nestof3

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 11:33 PM

I believe sports teams, military, etc. use it as a form of discipline.

Forced exercise is a form of corporal punishment. I would prefer to organize the day so that the child and his family have ample opportunity to work off excess energy instead of waiting until child is disruptive and mete out punishment.

In the martial arts setting, what connection does the forced exercise have to the infraction? Why not explain to child what he did that was out of line and give constructive suggestions on how to deal with his situation?

Exercise is an appropriate and necessary component of building and maintaining physical fitness but not appropriate as a punishment in my opinion.



#41 kathkath

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 07:53 AM

Done properly, it's just a way to help the boys re-focus. It's direct, it's short, it breaks the behavior cycle that's causing them to be silly or not listen, and there's not a lot of talking at them.

Cat


that's why I was wondering if it would be good to do at home. Still mulling here.

#42 2squared

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 08:20 AM

I can see doing something active when needing a break, but then we'd all do it, as I could use it as much as the boys.


I like this idea! Family punishment. I could sure use it.

#43 stripe

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 09:16 AM

I have had my son especially go run around to burn off excess energy when I think he is "misbehaving" as a result of being pent up inside for too long.

Other than that, I am not into this.

#44 LibraryLover

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 11:58 AM

I agree. iI's one thing to help children use pent -up energy, but using it to punish children punishment is quite another. I agree with the poster who said this is a form of corporal punishment, which is not something dh and I believe is helpful to the growth of our children/tone of our family life. I can certainly see a walk or a run or a family bike ride to aide in using energy, and being physically healthy.

I realize the military uses it for training, and I am not opposed to pushups for grown adults who join an organization understanding the demands of said organization.

4 years old? Not so much. ;)

I have had my son especially go run around to burn off excess energy when I think he is "misbehaving" as a result of being pent up inside for too long.

Other than that, I am not into this.



#45 silliness7

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 12:26 PM

Corporal punishment sounds a little extreme...almost sounds like one of those logical fallacies. But I can't remember which one. Darn it! Where's my book? ;)

I have used running up and down the stairs before but not necessarily as "punishment", more for re-focusing an antsy kiddo.

My dh uses push-ups and lap-running in soccer practice as a dicipline tool. I may need to incorporate some more physical release with my boys.

#46 RanchGirl

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 04:14 PM

I think it depends on the kid. I use jumping jacks and jogging on the rebounder as a redirect for my younger, slightly volatile son when I can tell he is about to lose it emotionally. Then hopefully he won't do anything he needs to be punished for. (Well a girl can hope, can't she?) Super big bear hugs and tickling are helpful for him too. My older son is different - he really needs time to be alone and regroup, so physical activity is not as effective with him.

I don't use exercise as punishment because it can be too fun for punishment. Ten pushups only takes 1 minute... I want them to have to think about the error of their ways for longer than that. I stick with time outs for a younger child and removing privileges for an older child. Both of my kids would much rather do pushups than lose computer time!

I tried adding cleaning chores too but that didn't work either, they just did a half a$$ed job of it. (Then *I* needed to do jumping jacks to calm down. grr.)

By the way, my son's football and basketball teams used pushups and "killers" (running drill) when the kids were squirrely and that was quite effective in that situation. But that wasn't until around age 10.

#47 katilac

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 07:42 PM

For those worried about 4-yr-olds not doing push-ups correctly, the OP does make it clear that it's a very modified variation, not real push-ups.

For those who think it's corporal punishment: can you elaborate? Do you mean if it's done to the point of creating pain, or if it's done at all?

I've never done it as 'punishment' per se (as in, for disobedience or such), but we have done it for wrong answers during school :D. It's not as evil as it sounds; we do 'action Latin' or 'action math' and the kids toss a ball back and forth while reciting conjugations or math facts or such. Miss an answer and run a lap around the yard. There's always much laughter involved; the more laps, the more laughter.

It seems to make good sense to me used as a DISCIPLINARY tool; as in, you can't focus, go run laps until you can. I'm less of a fan of PUNISHMENT in general, so no screaming in anger drill instructor style.

the OP's scenario wouldn't worry me at all. in a sport, you practice things over and over again until you get them right; it's not a 'punishment' to swing the bat until your form is correct, and it's not necessarily a 'punishment' to re-do push ups if you count wrong. the pull of martial arts for me would be the discipline and attention to detail, so it doesn't matter if you 'accidentally' do the wrong number of push ups - - you were supposed to do 10, not 9 or 11, so pay attention and do it again. Doesn't sound awful, assuming the instructor is matter of fact about it.

#48 tess in the burbs

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 08:15 PM

ours did it at gymnastics and honestly I was ok with that. I didn't like him taking away the fun pit at the end b/c usually they were only 'bad' for a minute and still worked their butts off the rest of the hour and losing the fun pit was too harsh!

but heck, we have an indoor jumpy thing for when school jitters need to be let out

#49 vettechmomof2

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 08:15 PM

I wonder if boys and girls react to physical exercise as punishment differently. Does anyone have both boys and girls that they have tried it on? Was it different? The same?


We do it for both. son and daughter.
Not push ups but running around the property(lots of hills) and the trampoline or practice their kata moves to help refocus them.
We do not make note that it is punishment but use exercise as a way to clear our heads and help us think about behaving better.
Works well for both of my children and myself :tongue_smilie:

#50 Pink Fairy

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 08:45 PM


I've never done it as 'punishment' per se (as in, for disobedience or such), but we have done it for wrong answers during school :D. It's not as evil as it sounds; we do 'action Latin' or 'action math' and the kids toss a ball back and forth while reciting conjugations or math facts or such. Miss an answer and run a lap around the yard. There's always much laughter involved; the more laps, the more laughter.


This sounds like good, clean fun to me. :laugh: I might steal this idea! Not at all what I was first picturing when I read "we have done it for wrong answers during school", lol.


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