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How do homeschooled kids get accepted into major colleges?

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#1 teraberry

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 01:25 AM

I am a homeschool mom of three children, the oldest being a 7th grader. I would like to homeschool them through high school. What challenges does this pose for getting into major colleges? Do they all accept a transcript made by mom? What do community colleges require? I'm thinking of having them enter a community college early and then transfer to a larger college after they've earned some credits, however I really know little of the specifics. If anyone has been through this and can tell me how I can prepare for this, I'm all ears!

#2 creekland

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 06:58 AM

I am a homeschool mom of three children, the oldest being a 7th grader. I would like to homeschool them through high school. What challenges does this pose for getting into major colleges? Do they all accept a transcript made by mom? What do community colleges require? I'm thinking of having them enter a community college early and then transfer to a larger college after they've earned some credits, however I really know little of the specifics. If anyone has been through this and can tell me how I can prepare for this, I'm all ears!


Check out some of the posts on the college board recently. Homeschool students are easily accepted into most colleges and universities. We started homeschooling my boys when my oldest started 9th grade. He's now a senior and will be heading to college next year. We've had absolutely no problems getting him into the colleges of his choice - and have had several more, both secular and Christian, recruiting him heavily (phone calls, etc). One highly regarded secular school wanted him to skip his senior year and go there last year. No thanks.

The key is the same as for those in public school - good grades, good standardized tests (SAT/ACT), good recommendations, and good extra curricular activities.

College admissions people have told me that homeschoolers are among their best students, but they need a way to confirm mommy grades. You can do this through the SAT/ACT, AP tests, SAT II tests, or community college classes. My oldest had high SAT/ACT scores and one community college class (English Comp) to confirm grades - and then had great recommendation letters along with decent extra curriculars (Chess Team, traveling, youth groups, mission trips, work for dad, scuba, geocaching, etc). He's gotten really good scholarship offers as well as admission.

My middle son will be getting a couple of community college courses and, if needed by the colleges he wants to apply to, SAT II or AP tests. Since he wants medical research, we're also going to have him do a shadowing program at our local hospital along with his other extra curriculars.

The best advice is to check with colleges your students might be interested in and see what they require of homeschoolers, BUT realize these requirements are likely to change over the next 6 years. Most colleges are requiring less as time goes on, not more, but they all have told us that basic - show us something to confirm the grades on the transcript. I'll add, "make sure your student is interesting enough for us to want them here (extra curriculars)." That may not be needed for some places that go solely off grades and test scores, but it sure helps with top scholarship offers.

#3 Blue Hen

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 01:41 PM

You have come to the right place! :) Many here have been through it before and hearing their stories have inspired those of us who are still in this journey.

My oldest is a senior, has been accepted to five colleges so far and received three scholarships from so far. Selective colleges too: Case Western Reserve, Colorado School of Mines, Drexel Univeristy, Tulane University and Rose-Hulman Institute. He has four other colleges he will hear from this winter.

M*** has a mommy-made transcript, AP test scores, SAT II Subject Test scores and SAT scores to back-up the mommy-grades on his transcript. From my visits here and also from being part of the yahoo group HS2COLL I learned how to put together his package. (Thanks to Kareni & Brenda for letting me see their kids stuff too).

Yes, some folks have their kids take classes at the CC. It wasn't an option for us. Since my DS was wanting a challenge we turned to online AP courses (I do teach AP Statistics for PA HS'ers). Some kids take a course or two at the local public school. Our PS won't even permit a hs'er to take an AP test with their students let alone take a class. Some kids never take a class at the CC, or an AP course or test and are readily accepted into college too.

Welcome to the high school board!

Carole

Edited by Blue Hen, 24 December 2009 - 01:43 PM.
Fix the link.


#4 Chris in VA

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 03:06 PM

My son had a mommy transcript, took the SAT, and still needed to take the GED in order to get into Virginia Commonwealth University. Checking with the colleges of choice is the best way to know how to prepare.

#5 LoriM

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 03:57 PM

I am a homeschool mom of three children, the oldest being a 7th grader. I would like to homeschool them through high school. What challenges does this pose for getting into major colleges? Do they all accept a transcript made by mom? What do community colleges require? I'm thinking of having them enter a community college early and then transfer to a larger college after they've earned some credits, however I really know little of the specifics. If anyone has been through this and can tell me how I can prepare for this, I'm all ears!


I brought my older dd home in 7th grade. She homeschooled through high school, completing "conceptual" calculus at home with me at age 15, as well as all her requirements for high school (full science sequences, full history sequences, full literature sequences, three years of Latin, etc.). So, she enrolled in the community college fulltime at age 16, "dual enrolled" (still doing some courses at home, but mostly growing up and taking college classes). In a year and a half, she had an associate degree. In another two and a half years, she's graduated with a BA in mathematics...and is getting married next month.

So, it will all come at you fast...but it's easily planned for. We sat down after 7th grade and drew up a five year plan for 8th-12th, and mostly stuck to it. :) Our plan made sure we kept our options open for flexibility as she grew up and changed her mind.

Read everything you can on this board, and just keep enjoying your adventure. The next thing you know, you'll be attending a college graduation. GRIN.

Lori, whose daughter graduated last weekend...and has 23 days left before the wedding...

#6 Margo out of lurking

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 11:27 AM

Homeschoolers at major colleges is no longer an issue, and many college websites have a specific link for homeschooled students.

In addition to the HS2College link posted above, I would also recommend The HomeScholar. I've known Lee online for years, and while this is her business, there is a TON of free and helpful info available here. I've learned a lot, I haven't paid anything ever yet, but if and when I ever need more advice, I would gladly seek her out.

Merry Christmas!

#7 Lynn in TX

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 02:33 PM

My oldest did the American School route. I combined this with TWTM. I haven't posted in a few years, but I did a long post on this on the old boards. He just graduated from college this semester. He got a partial scholarship based on his test scores.

#8 Carmen_and_Company

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Posted 26 December 2009 - 09:25 PM

Taz provided a transcript and portfolio on CDrom with each application. He also did well on the SAT and ACT tests.

Each edition of TWTM outlines how to create a transcript along with how to title course work.

#9 teraberry

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Posted 26 December 2009 - 10:22 PM

Thanks so much for the advice, everyone. I have to admit that I'm a bit worried about having my children prepared for college. I'm a fairly laid-back type of individual. I love teaching them and they are bright kids, however administrative type stuff is not my strong suit. So the thought of providing an impressive transcript is a bit daunting. You've been a big encouragement though and I plan on frequenting this board more often so I can keep learning and get the job done.

#10 Sandy in Indy

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Posted 27 December 2009 - 06:58 PM

One thing I would suggest is to build your transcript semester by semester. Don't wait till the senior year and try to remember what you did in the freshman year.

I had my ds's transcript sketched out before beginning the high school years. Each semester I adjusted and added grades as needed as well as SAT scores. When he was ready to apply to university, all I had to do was print! I also kept a list of what curriculum we had used for each subject. One school wanted course descriptions and curriculum titles. It was easy to compile with the information I had saved.

DS was accepted to all the schools to which he applied...just finished his first semester with a 3.94/4.0.

#11 Ellie

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Posted 27 December 2009 - 11:22 PM

I am a homeschool mom of three children, the oldest being a 7th grader. I would like to homeschool them through high school.

Congratulations. :-)

What challenges does this pose for getting into major colleges? Do they all accept a transcript made by mom?

Most colleges do. Some don't. When your oldest reaches that age, you'll want to contact the colleges he's interested in attending and ask specifically what they require. And apparently, you'll need to ask more than once, as they can change their requirements at any time.:glare:

What do community colleges require? I'm thinking of having them enter a community college early and then transfer to a larger college after they've earned some credits, however I really know little of the specifics. If anyone has been through this and can tell me how I can prepare for this, I'm all ears!

It depends. In California, the main requirement is the ability to breathe in and out, lol. There are no requirements for high school diploma or SAT/ACT scores or anything. Many will require a placement test which determines the student's English and math ability; admission to some classes depends on that placement test (students who test low can take basic classes, which don't count as college credit, after which they can sign up for the college-level classes). Both of my dds enrolled in c.c. when they were 14, as college students not dual-enrolled, high school students, and did c.c instead of high school. This is not possible in all states, though.

#12 Kareni

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Posted 28 December 2009 - 12:48 AM

What do community colleges require?


It depends. In California, the main requirement is the ability to breathe in and out, lol. ...


In my state, the ability to breathe in and out is also a requirement as is the ability to pay! Here students must take a placement test to determine what math and writing class would be appropriate for them. It is possible to take some courses that do not have a math or writing requirement. When students are under the age of 18, they must alert each instructor to that fact. The instructor then has the prerogative of refusing them admission to his or her own class. (Sometimes this is done when the instructor feels that the material is not appropriate for an underage student.) I know that requirements for community college admission vary widely. I'd suggest seeing what requirements are listed at your nearest community college.

Regards,
Kareni



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