Jump to content

What's with the ads?


Photo

World history from a secular perspective?

secular secular history

This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
50 replies to this topic

What's with the ads?

#1 Momling

Momling

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2310 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 12:18 PM

There are lots of great threads on this forum about history curriculum, but I'm still at a loss to find something that fits for us. After the rave reviews of SOTW, I flipped through it at the bookstore and was a bit disappointed.

What I'm looking for is a book or series that:
-is substantial and doesn't talk down to children.
-is visually appealing (font/layout/pictures)
-is secular (though thoughtfully discusses world religions)
-includes both western and non-western history (not just a token chapter)
-includes excerpts from primary sources
-includes questions or activities or extra materials besides just the text.

Any reading level is probably fine... It's for a weirdly mature 7 yr old who reads everything and loves history.

Any thoughts?

Thanks!

#2 Matryoshka

Matryoshka

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8194 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 12:32 PM

You might like K12's Human Odyssey books.

They are written as a middle school text, but I'm going to use them as a read-aloud spine for my 8yo as well as my 11yos. They are written engagingly, and they include non-western cultures and definitely include a thoughtful and balanced treatment of world religions. They are colorful and well laid-out (font/pictures/use of white space).

The ISBN for the first volume (prehistory - middle ages) is 1931728534.

#3 JenneinAZ

JenneinAZ

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1756 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 12:38 PM

You might look at the DK Eyewitness books. They are on many topics in history and other topics too.

#4 Michelle T

Michelle T

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2063 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 12:40 PM

Secular world history curriculum.
Michelle T

#5 Crimson Wife

Crimson Wife

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14141 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 12:50 PM

I haven't found one so what we do is unit studies with the KHE as the spine and incorporating book recommendations from various places (the SOTW AG, TWTM, DYOCC, SL, HO, etc), back issues of assorted children's history magazines (Calliope, Learning Through History, Moo Cow Fan Club, Kids Discover, etc), and lots of documentaries from the library (PBS, the History Channel, A&E, TLC, etc).

#6 christine in al

christine in al

    Hive Mind Royal Larvae

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 678 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 12:51 PM

Just to have. my ds just browses though it for fun.

I'm already on SOTW, but am looking at History Odessy for the next round.

We spent the first part of this year on Story of US. The first book is several chapters of the variety of peoples who were already here when the European Invasion began.

sometimes a bit cute, but I really like her approach,
And the video series 500 Nations,,, ( oh wait, ,,, a bit too real for 7 years old probably, but keep it on the back burner.)

I'm interested in SouthEast Asian history, but haven't found much in the Ancient history area.

~c in AL

#7 shukriyya

shukriyya

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3037 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 12:52 PM

You might try Gombrich's A Little History of the World. It has a lot of what you want in terms of tone and content but there's not an AG to go with it. You could supplement activities with SOTW AGs.

#8 Crimson Wife

Crimson Wife

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14141 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 12:58 PM

I forgot to mention a resource that you might really like for discussion questions & activities. I don't use it so much because it's a bit on the politically correct side for my tastes. But I have held on to it and do pull it out from time to time because it does have some great ideas, particularly for non-Western civilizations. It's called Bring History Alive! A Sourcebook for Teaching World History by the National Center for History in the Schools at UCLA.

#9 nmoira

nmoira

    Hard-hearted harbinger of haggis and hypocrisy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15889 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 01:33 PM

You might try Gombrich's A Little History of the World. It has a lot of what you want in terms of tone and content but there's not an AG to go with it. You could supplement activities with SOTW AGs.

We were using it piecemeal, but I put it away after he said that people were "better" after the advent of Christianity. (Sorry, I don't have the exact quote, but can look it up later.)

#10 Spy Car

Spy Car

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18047 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 01:36 PM

:lurk5:

#11 Lovedtodeath

Lovedtodeath

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14978 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 01:36 PM

SOTW is meant to be a spine... not the program. My program includes works adapted from Virgil and Homer, as well as Plutarch, but these are not part of the spine. They are additional scheduled reading. There are many very rich books (even picture books, as they are not written for children to read, but rather as read alouds) that will include what you are wanting.

The Usborne Encyclopedia is also an excellent spine that has most of the same information as SOTW, a secular timeline and wonderful illustrations and maps that greatly enhance any history program. Some people prefer a narrative history spine. I really think the encyclopedia does a fine job without SOTW. We are visual learners around here, so the encyclopedia works great and the narrative part of history comes from our other books. I am saving SOTW for a straight read through as review rather than reading a chapter per week.

There are lots of great threads on this forum about history curriculum, but I'm still at a loss to find something that fits for us. After the rave reviews of SOTW, I flipped through it at the bookstore and was a bit disappointed.

What I'm looking for is a book or series that:
-is substantial and doesn't talk down to children.
-is visually appealing (font/layout/pictures)
-is secular (though thoughtfully discusses world religions)
-includes both western and non-western history (not just a token chapter)
-includes excerpts from primary sources
-includes questions or activities or extra materials besides just the text.

Any reading level is probably fine... It's for a weirdly mature 7 yr old who reads everything and loves history.

Any thoughts?

Thanks!

It sounds like some of what you are describing (excerpts from primary sources) would be more suitable for the logic stage. I also think that as I stated before, there are resources that go with a program utilizing SOTW, such as questions, extra materials and activities. You simply did not see them in the SOTW text itself. Have you seen the SOTW Activity Guide?

You might like K12's Human Odyssey books.

They are written as a middle school text, but I'm going to use them as a read-aloud spine for my 8yo as well as my 11yos. They are written engagingly, and they include non-western cultures and definitely include a thoughtful and balanced treatment of world religions. They are colorful and well laid-out (font/pictures/use of white space).

The ISBN for the first volume (prehistory - middle ages) is 1931728534.

This is what came to my mind as well.

Edited by Lovedtodeath, 13 November 2009 - 01:48 PM.


#12 Lovedtodeath

Lovedtodeath

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14978 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 01:42 PM

We were using it piecemeal, but I put it away after he said that people were "better" after the advent of Christianity. (Sorry, I don't have the exact quote, but can look it up later.)

I will never understand why A Little History of the World is thought of as more secular than SOTW. It is far from it. Here is my review. And as far as being illustrated or including source documents it is no different than SOTW.

#13 nmoira

nmoira

    Hard-hearted harbinger of haggis and hypocrisy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15889 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 01:43 PM

We have these two sets for use as logic stage spines:

The World in Ancient Times
The Medieval and Early Modern World

Watch the December Oxford sale on Amazon. I picked these up for $60 and $55 respectively a couple years ago. Each set has a dedicated volume of primary source materials.

I've also heard good things about Suzanne Strauss Art's texts, though haven't yet picked up any.

Edited by nmoira, 13 November 2009 - 01:58 PM.
grammar


#14 Lovedtodeath

Lovedtodeath

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14978 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 01:55 PM

You would probably really like some of the old KingFisher history encyclopedias, as they read more like a narrative, are more appropriate for higher grade levels, and are very visually appealing.

The SOTW AG has a schedule for both the Usborne encyclopedia and one of the Kingfisher encyclopedias. You can use the AG as a teacher's guide without actually using SOTW.

#15 54879525

54879525

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55102 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 01:56 PM

I agree with Carmen. I use SOTW, but it really is only a guide/spine.

#16 MIch elle

MIch elle

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5040 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 02:09 PM

http://www.eduplace.com/ss/hmss/

#17 MamaSheep

MamaSheep

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3905 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 02:58 PM

We have these two sets for use as logic stage spines:

The World in Ancient Times
The Medieval and Early Modern World

Watch the December Oxford sale on Amazon. I picked these up for $60 and $55 respectively a couple years ago. Each set has a dedicated volume of primary source materials.

I've also heard good things about Suzanne Strauss Art's texts, though haven't yet picked up any.


Now you have me longing for a good, cheap paperback set....sigh...

#18 Crimson Wife

Crimson Wife

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14141 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 03:05 PM

I will never understand why A Little History of the World is thought of as more secular than SOTW. It is far from it. Here is my review.


My copy of A Little History of the World has a quote on the cover from Phillip Pullman, praising it as "brilliant, irresistible". Pullman is an outspoken atheist notorious for his criticism of traditional Christianity. If HE likes the book, I don't see how it can possibly be considered "too Christian". :confused:

#19 54879525

54879525

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55102 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 03:14 PM

My copy of A Little History of the World has a quote on the cover from Phillip Pullman, praising it as "brilliant, irresistible". Pullman is an outspoken atheist notorious for his criticism of traditional Christianity. If HE likes the book, I don't see how it can possibly be considered "too Christian". :confused:


I never read the book, but found this comment on Amazon:

This book was worse than bad - it is well-written misinformation that will leave the reader thinking he or she has been well-informed. Clearly written from a Christian perspective, the author bends and twists history to the breaking point to make it fit his world-view. In this book, all of the historical claims of the bible are accepted as fact, when many are in dispute or are seriously doubted by serious historians. Characters of the Old Testament that may have never existed, and events that may have never happened are presented as if they have as much legitimacy as secular history. At one point, the author claims that the Dark Ages were actually more like a starry night because the people of Europe had the guiding light of "their Lord" shining on them. Ugh!

In addition, the author characterizes other historical figures in overly romantic terms. Alexander, Julius Caesar and Augustus are spoken of with great reverance, with little notice of their brutal, amoral behavior. Modern historians understand that history is written by the winners, and take a dim view of simply assuming that powerful world figures were as noble and wise as their propanganda claimed.

This is history for people who don't want their worldview challenged - even by the truth - if they learned most of their history before 1975. If you want to actually learn something useful, look elsewhere.


#20 Matryoshka

Matryoshka

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8194 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 03:43 PM

We have these two sets for use as logic stage spines:

The World in Ancient Times
The Medieval and Early Modern World


I'm planning to use these alongside the K12 books. I love these! But these really are logic stage level - I think that the K12 books are more than engaging enough to read aloud to all three kids, but these I'm just having my older two read to themselves (and I'm going to use a different set of books for my younger dd to read to herself). I love that there's a primary source volume for each series!

I've also heard good things about Suzanne Strauss Art's texts, though haven't yet picked up any.


I checked some of these out of the library to compare - have to say I far prefer the two series above.

#21 stripe

stripe

    J'ai besoin de tout mon courage

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14000 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 03:44 PM

We were using it piecemeal, but I put it away after he said that people were "better" after the advent of Christianity. (Sorry, I don't have the exact quote, but can look it up later.)

I found all religious commentary of Gombrich's to be on the odd side (either mildly so or extremely!). I wrote a post about it a few months back, and I have read posts by others saying something similar.

I have just purchased this book: Global History and Geography: the Growth of Civilizations by Henry Brun. It's sort of textbookish, definitely for older kids than early elementary (which mine are at as well) and fairly large, and I haven't read it, but I got it on someone's recommendation. So you might see if you can find it or get more info. I will take a look at it and see what I think.

I also bought one of the Oxford books that interested me, and my library has some of the others (in fact, I requested they buy the ones they don't have!), but they look interesting. But a bit old.

I struggle with the exact same issue, so I am watching this thread with great interest!

#22 Spy Car

Spy Car

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18047 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 03:48 PM

I found all religious commentary of Gombrich's to be on the odd side (either mildly so or extremely!). I wrote a post about it a few months back, and I have read posts by others saying something similar.


:iagree:

And "ODD" is exactly the word I would choose.

Bill

#23 Closeacademy

Closeacademy

    Makjang Drama Queen

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2981 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 04:06 PM

The second time around, we are dumping the spines. I've found this site:

http://missbarbara.n...eatlessons.html This is a nice get started site and then we are just going to do lapbooks from homeschoolshare and handsofachild for the various cultures while reading their myths.

My line-up for mythology includes:

Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt
Pyramid
D'Aulaire Greek Myths
Famous Men of Greece
Famous Men of Rome

Our lapbook units include:

Dinosaurs from Live and Learn
Ice Age from Hands of a Child
Ancient Mesopotamia from Hands of a Child
Ancient Egypt from Homeschoolshare.com
Ancient Greece from Homeschoolshare.com
Ancient Rome from Homeschoolshare.com


Pretty much, we are winging it. But it starts in January. The kids did get fairly interested and involved in watching "Becoming Human" on PBS. We watched the second in the series which was about Erectus. :001_smile:

#24 nmoira

nmoira

    Hard-hearted harbinger of haggis and hypocrisy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15889 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 04:45 PM

My copy of A Little History of the World has a quote on the cover from Phillip Pullman, praising it as "brilliant, irresistible". Pullman is an outspoken atheist notorious for his criticism of traditional Christianity. If HE likes the book, I don't see how it can possibly be considered "too Christian". :confused:

Not all atheists share the same opinions, any more than do all Christians. However Pullman may feel about the book, I'm pretty sure he was not reviewing it with a mind to using it with a young child in a homeschooling capacity.

Off topic: Here's part of a fascinating dialogue between the Archbishop of Canterbury and Philip Pullman.

#25 54879525

54879525

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55102 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 04:50 PM

Not all atheists share the same opinions, any more than do all Christians. However Pullman may feel about the book, I'm pretty sure he was not reviewing it with a mind to using it with a young child in a homeschooling capacity.


:iagree:

#26 Lovedtodeath

Lovedtodeath

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14978 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 05:09 PM

My copy of A Little History of the World has a quote on the cover from Phillip Pullman, praising it as "brilliant, irresistible". Pullman is an outspoken atheist notorious for his criticism of traditional Christianity. If HE likes the book, I don't see how it can possibly be considered "too Christian". :confused:

Did you read my review?

Here are some things that are said in the reading:

"Do you know the story of the Tower of Babel, when the people of...God was angry ... and stopped them... ?"

One of Abraham of Ur's descendants was Joseph, son of Jacob, whose brothers took him ... You may know how the story goes on: how there was a famine throughout the land, and how Joseph's brothers travelled to Egypt.

The Bible has lots of good stories about the next kings, King David and King Solomon.

Men arose among them compelled to speak to their people because God spoke through them.

You can read about Jesus Christ in the Bible. You probably know the essentials of what he taught: That all men are God's children. That the love of this father is infinite. That.... sinners. That... mercy. You know what mercy is: The great and forgiving love of God. And that is why we should treat others as we hope our God, our Father, will treat us.

And you know that Jesus traveled, healing the sick...

Apostle Paul wrote to the Corinthians: "If I don't have love..."


I am a Christian, but when I read A Little History of the World I was choosing a narrative spine for a secular curriculum that I was working on, so I was reading it with that in mind. SOTW is definitely more secular than A Little History of the World, and I chose it instead. SOTW definitely goes into much more detail as well.

I noticed the romanticizing of Alexander the Great as well. I rather enjoyed it though. ;) The Usborne Alexander the Great biography does a good job of including his faults; almost too good.

#27 smrtmama

smrtmama

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1346 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 05:32 PM

There are lots of great threads on this forum about history curriculum, but I'm still at a loss to find something that fits for us. After the rave reviews of SOTW, I flipped through it at the bookstore and was a bit disappointed.

What I'm looking for is a book or series that:
-is substantial and doesn't talk down to children.
-is visually appealing (font/layout/pictures)
-is secular (though thoughtfully discusses world religions)
-includes both western and non-western history (not just a token chapter)
-includes excerpts from primary sources
-includes questions or activities or extra materials besides just the text.

Any reading level is probably fine... It's for a weirdly mature 7 yr old who reads everything and loves history.

Any thoughts?

Thanks!


We're using History: The Definitive Visual Guide by DK Publishing as our history spine and books from their Eyewitness series as support materials. You'll have to develop your own activities, but we use those recommended in WTM for history -- timeline, important dates/people, vocabulary, summaries.

#28 MamaSheep

MamaSheep

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3905 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 05:34 PM

I forgot to mention a resource that you might really like for discussion questions & activities. I don't use it so much because it's a bit on the politically correct side for my tastes. But I have held on to it and do pull it out from time to time because it does have some great ideas, particularly for non-Western civilizations. It's called Bring History Alive! A Sourcebook for Teaching World History by the National Center for History in the Schools at UCLA.


What other resources do you use for discussion questions and activities?

#29 Crimson Wife

Crimson Wife

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14141 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 05:50 PM

It's funny because I had flagged A Little History of the World as something needing a preview based on the Pullman quote. I figured that if he liked it, I would definitely need to read it before handing it over to my DD (we're Catholic). She received it as a Christmas gift last year and it's been on my shelf ever since. I'd forgotten about it until today. :blushing:

#30 Karen in CO

Karen in CO

    Co-ordinator of Synchronicity

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6670 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 05:56 PM

Take Me Back - is my Dd8's favorite new history book. She started at the first page and has been reading through on her own. Earlier this week, we had a great discussion over breakfast about human migration based on what she had read the night before. I'm not sure how I will incorporate it into our history because right now it just has a place of honor by her bed, but it might make a great spine for someone.

#31 Laura Corin

Laura Corin

    She who plants flowers for bees

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17216 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 06:00 PM

You might like to look at Junior History from Galore Park - there are samples on the website for all three books in the series.

Laura

#32 Crimson Wife

Crimson Wife

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14141 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 06:05 PM

What other resources do you use for discussion questions and activities?


For activities: SOTW AG, Kaleidoscope Kids books, Step Into the Past series, The Crafts and Culture of ... series, Crafts from the Past series, History/Literature Pockets, Arlette Braman's activity books, Teacher Created Resources Thematic Units, activities from Learning through History and Moo Cow Fan Club magazine, etc.

For discussion questions, I do take a look at the ones listed in the SOTW AG and the Bringing History Alive! book. But my DD is insatiably curious and always asking me questions about stuff we've read. Usually I try to turn her questions around and help her think through them herself.

#33 AngieW in Texas

AngieW in Texas

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6102 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 06:33 PM

Oak Meadow's 6th and 7th grade history are a 2-part world history program. It is secular. I haven't used it yet, but plan to use it with my youngest next year. We did SL Cores 6 and 7 last time through and I don't feel like doing the same thing again.

#34 MamaSheep

MamaSheep

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3905 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 10:32 PM

For activities: SOTW AG, Kaleidoscope Kids books, Step Into the Past series, The Crafts and Culture of ... series, Crafts from the Past series, History/Literature Pockets, Arlette Braman's activity books, Teacher Created Resources Thematic Units, activities from Learning through History and Moo Cow Fan Club magazine, etc.

For discussion questions, I do take a look at the ones listed in the SOTW AG and the Bringing History Alive! book. But my DD is insatiably curious and always asking me questions about stuff we've read. Usually I try to turn her questions around and help her think through them herself.


Thanks. :)

I think I'll be revisiting ancients next year with my kids. It'll be ds's second trip through but the first time was our first year homeschooling and there was so much trauma going on that I don't honestly know that anything stuck. For dd this will be the first time through and her second year homeschooling. In theory I can use the stuff I had for ds the first time through, but she takes such a different approach to learning than he did/does that I find myself thinking we're going to need to supplement what I've got, particularly in the area of activities (ds would rather die than color, cut, or paste; dd is a crafty diva). So this is good. Thank you.

Is the Bringing History Alive book out of print?

#35 stripe

stripe

    J'ai besoin de tout mon courage

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14000 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 11:17 PM

Out of pure curiosity, how is HE Marshall's Our Empire Story?

#36 Crimson Wife

Crimson Wife

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14141 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 11:29 PM

Thanks. :)

Is the Bringing History Alive book out of print?


It's available at Amazon or here. ISBN is 0963321854.

Edited by Crimson Wife, 13 November 2009 - 11:32 PM.
edited to add ISBN


#37 stripe

stripe

    J'ai besoin de tout mon courage

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14000 posts

Posted 14 November 2009 - 07:40 AM

Out of pure curiosity, how is HE Marshall's Our Empire Story?

Aha, I've found it on MainLesson.com
Looks plagued by some of the same problems I've read about elsewhere:

AFTER Champlain came many rulers. Some of them were strong and brave, others were weak and foolish. All of them had to fight against their deadly enemies the Iroquois; and for many years the story of New France was one of suffering and terror. The hate of the Red Man never rested, and time after time he fell upon the French with savage strength. He swept through the land, leaving behind him a memory of blood and torture.

When the whites first came to Canada, the Indians were as wild and ignorant as our forefathers had been when the Romans first landed upon the shores of Britain. In some ways, indeed, the Red Man was more savage, for the Britons in that far-off time had swords of iron and copper. The Red Man knew nothing of metals. His tomahawk was of stone, the head being fastened to a wooden handle by thongs of leather. His arrow heads were of flint. His greatest treasure was "wampum," that is, beads made of shells. These beads were used for making belts, and a belt of wampum was the grandest present which an Indian could give to any one.

The first two paragraphs of a chapter I opened at random, The Feast of Eat-Everything.


But I would like a good history of the British Empire...sigh.

#38 Lovedtodeath

Lovedtodeath

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14978 posts

Posted 14 November 2009 - 11:21 AM

MamaSheep, I really like Ancient Egyptians and their Neighbors and Ancient Israelites and their neighbors. Really good info perfect for writing assignments plus projects/activities.

#39 EKS

EKS

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10603 posts

Posted 14 November 2009 - 11:44 AM

This may be a bit advanced now, but K12's Human Odyssey is absolutely fabulous. It has everything on your list except the questions/activities part (which you can get by enrolling in K12's online courses, but those courses are targeted to 7th and 8th graders).

#40 nmoira

nmoira

    Hard-hearted harbinger of haggis and hypocrisy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15889 posts

Posted 14 November 2009 - 11:48 AM

MamaSheep, I really like Ancient Egyptians and their Neighbors and Ancient Israelites and their neighbors.

These are fantastic resources.

#41 Spy Car

Spy Car

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18047 posts

Posted 14 November 2009 - 12:53 PM

Looks plagued by some of the same problems I've read about elsewhere:


Marshall write with verve. She does. But her works are loaded with these types of characterizations, towards many different groups. There is no way I could "edit on the fly", as the objectionable passages are all-too pervasive.

Other use these to teach how bigotry was pervasive in the bad-old days. But that's not for me. It's too bad because her works are not without merit.

Bill

#42 woolybear

woolybear

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3667 posts

Posted 15 November 2009 - 11:14 AM

I'm not sure that this meets all your requirements, but it is worth checking out. www.brimwoodpress.com has some nice resources. Calendar quest and history fact sheets appear to be two good resources. I have calendar quest and we read it a couple of years ago. I don't remember it too well, but I know my son enjoyed it.

Wooly

#43 laundrycrisis

laundrycrisis

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3029 posts

Posted 15 November 2009 - 12:12 PM

I am a minimalist. I am using The Complete Book of World History by School Specialty Publishing.

(I came back to add that I am also a history chicken....and just sticking my own toes into history for the first time in my life. I'm not ready to be overwhelmed by it. This is part of why I'm starting with a very minimalist approach to it.)

I will also use:

The Kingfisher Atlas of the Ancient World by Simon Adams
An Illustrated History of the World by Gillian Clements
The Picture History of Great Explorers by Gillian Clements

And various other books I find or check out along the way.

I also read the Kingfisher Atlas of Exploration and Empires, and I liked it, but some of the tiny pictures in it really bothered me - a human sacrifice, torture, execution at the guillotine.....I know they are part of history but I'm not ready to deal with little cartoon illustrations of those things with my young kids. Blech.

Edited by laundrycrisis, 15 November 2009 - 02:55 PM.


#44 MamaSheep

MamaSheep

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3905 posts

Posted 16 November 2009 - 06:20 PM

It's available at Amazon or here. ISBN is 0963321854.

Thank you! I looked up the world history one at Amazon by ISBN before and it only listed 3rd party used book sellers, which was what made me think it might be out of print. I appreciate your taking time to find these for me.

MamaSheep, I really like Ancient Egyptians and their Neighbors and Ancient Israelites and their neighbors. Really good info perfect for writing assignments plus projects/activities.


Thanks, I'll look into those as well. :)

Edited by MamaSheep, 16 November 2009 - 06:25 PM.


#45 Momling

Momling

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2310 posts

Posted 18 November 2009 - 11:38 AM

Thank you all for your responses! I'm the original poster and am so impressed by the collective knowledge that this group has. You've given me new ideas and helped me re-evaluate what I thought I wanted.

I've come to realize that my daughter has a lifetime to learn from the more substantial textbooks and that at 7 1/2, she doesn't need the depth that a middle school book has. We've decided to go with the British 'Jr. History' series that Laura suggested (which, incidentally, are available on Amazon without international shipping costs). It looks like a lively and appropriate book for her. She was tickled by the text and pictures and is excited because we're planning a trip to the UK in the spring. She can't wait to do book 3 (on British history). I'll let you know how it goes!

#46 stripe

stripe

    J'ai besoin de tout mon courage

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14000 posts

Posted 18 November 2009 - 01:06 PM

We've decided to go with the British 'Jr. History' series that Laura suggested (which, incidentally, are available on Amazon without international shipping costs).

I saw the Galore Park books on Amazon too, but now they're not showing up as available anymore. Only from third party sellers. But they are on Book Depository, and seem to be cheaper than what Amazon was selling them for, at least for the few I'd taken a look at.

#47 Laura Corin

Laura Corin

    She who plants flowers for bees

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17216 posts

Posted 20 November 2009 - 07:30 PM

We've decided to go with the British 'Jr. History' series that Laura suggested


I've not used them as they were not available when we started on history and we are wedded to SOTW, but I would definitely have considered them otherwise.

Laura

#48 LibraryLover

LibraryLover

    Visualizing whirled peas

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17012 posts

Posted 20 November 2009 - 08:06 PM

Thank you all for your responses! I'm the original poster and am so impressed by the collective knowledge that this group has. You've given me new ideas and helped me re-evaluate what I thought I wanted.

I've come to realize that my daughter has a lifetime to learn from the more substantial textbooks and that at 7 1/2, she doesn't need the depth that a middle school book has. We've decided to go with the British 'Jr. History' series that Laura suggested (which, incidentally, are available on Amazon without international shipping costs). It looks like a lively and appropriate book for her. She was tickled by the text and pictures and is excited because we're planning a trip to the UK in the spring. She can't wait to do book 3 (on British history). I'll let you know how it goes!



Yep. This place is a wealth of info for all manner of folks. :)

#49 Lovedtodeath

Lovedtodeath

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14978 posts

Posted 20 November 2009 - 08:16 PM

CoreKnowledge Pearson History and Geography

#50 meet me in paris

meet me in paris

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1550 posts

Posted 22 November 2009 - 08:38 AM

Take Me Back - is my Dd8's favorite new history book. She started at the first page and has been reading through on her own. Earlier this week, we had a great discussion over breakfast about human migration based on what she had read the night before. I'm not sure how I will incorporate it into our history because right now it just has a place of honor by her bed, but it might make a great spine for someone.

:iagree:
We checked that one out from the library and renewed it as many times as we could. I'm buying it for dd11 for Christmas this year. She *loved* it.


What's with the ads?